News Categories
Archives

Why We love Doctor Who

Guest contributor Pauline Russett ponders the most important question.

all-doctors-day-of-the-doctor

According to various articles here and comments everywhere, our fandom appears to be having a bit of a crisis of late. I’m quite over the arguing. I think we need to look back for a minute at why we watch this wonderful show in the first place and what it tells us. This is a very simplistic retelling of my journey of how I came to love Doctor Who. The first day I watched a Doctor Who episode, I had no idea how pivotal that moment would be in my life. My Dad used to watch Star Trek episodes by himself until one day (I was probably five or something) I thought he looked a little lonely and sat with him. That was the day I became the only little girl I knew (at least then) that adored science-fiction.

About two or three years later he was very excited about some other sci-fi show – one he said hadn’t been made in a long time but he had loved as a little boy. In Australia, the air date of Rose would have been later than what you lucky ducks got in the UK. I watched it and immediately liked Rose. The Doctor seemed a strange man and I didn’t understand why his ship was a police box but the idea of travelling in time and space- that was pretty cool!

As the first new series aired I began to love Doctor Who not for just spending time with Dad but for the amazing new worlds I saw and how the Doctor with the occasional cry of Fantastic! saved the innocent from such terrible monsters. When I discovered that three kids my age were also Whovians I was beyond excited. Then came the regeneration.

tennant-doctor-rose-christmas-invasionDad explained why there was a new, younger man that was the Doctor but it didn’t feel right to me. I liked the old Doctor. Why would the show change the main actor for someone who’s babbling about new teeth? The Christmas Invasion I watched with arms crossed. When the Doctor was half asleep for most of it I was set that I wouldn’t like him when he woke up. Then he quoted The Lion King, grew a new hand and had won Rose’s trust again all in his pyjamas. Suddenly he wasn’t so bad.

Eventually I grew to be a HUGE David Tennant fan. He’s still my favourite Doctor today and always will be for his charm, wit, quirks and overwhelming desire to do and be the best he can. Number 10 is responsible for my love of Converse shoes, desire to just live in the moment being myself and habit to talk at a million miles an hour when I’m excited about a brilliant idea (why public speaking isn’t a forte).

Through each of his companions, I saw the Doctor in a new light and began to understand that Doctor Who is always changing and evolving; allowing it to examine new notions about humanity and life that keep it fresh. I started writing stories about the Doctor being in Australia and theorised with my ever-growing number of Whovian friends how the series would end, who River Song was etc. While the new series weren’t airing Dad and I would watch the old series- particularly Tom Baker’s and Peter Davidson’s eras- and I began to see just how big and wonderful Doctor Who really was.

Then The End of Time aired. I balled my eyes out like you wouldn’t believe. I was in a state of mourning for… well, my memory is hazy there. They were dark days. My mind kept on replaying his, “I don’t want to go” and I just wanted to shout at David Tennant, “Then why DID you!?”

Doctor-Who-The-Eleventh-Hour (17)I was still raw when we sat down to watch The Eleventh Hour. When I saw that the theme tune had been altered, the logo and another young man in my Doctor’s suit I was furious. Dad wasn’t too fussed. While he liked 10 (though his favourite will always be Tom Baker) he was able to come to terms with the change. As a big Whovian, he knew that the show is meant to grow and fundamentally, doesn’t really change. I came around in the end, to the point that whenever I see someone wearing a bow tie I tell them it’s cool (yes, even to strangers), buy fish fingers and custard as a snack occasionally and taught myself how to play I Am the Doctor on the piano for a laugh.

Now at 17 years of age I watched Matt Smith regenerate with tears in my eyes but my excitement to see Peter Capaldi’s era and how Clara’s character will grow outweighs my grief. Peter (probably) won’t be amused by a fez, say, “Allons-y!”, wear a ridiculously long scarf or maybe even like cricket and I know that’s okay. It’s how I want it to be because he’ll teach me in his own way how to see life differently.

While this article might seem self-indulgent, what I’m trying to share with you is the evolution in my love of Doctor Who. It’s all about the little changes but the important things don’t change. That means that no matter who the writers are, how old the actors are or any other myriad of arguments Whovians seem to be having at the moment, true Doctor Who fans must come to realise that change is inevitable.

capaldi-series-8-good-man-teaserWithout these differences over time Doctor Who wouldn’t have survived 50 years. Sure, you may not like Peter Capaldi’s Doctor at all, but that doesn’t mean that you should tell others they shouldn’t either or complain about the writers. Can you imagine writing a TV show for millions of people of all different ages and cultures? As if you would be able to please everyone! It’s just not possible. But boy did The Day of the Doctor come close!

If there is anything fans like you and me need to say to Steven Moffat, Peter Capaldi and all the other writers, producers, make-up artists, novelists, directors, stunt-doubles, grips, caterers, voices of the Daleks, actors in monster costumes, set designers, the BBC and all the people we never hear of who are involved, it’s thank you. Even the people who run Doctor Who TV, the Doctor Who Magazine and Doctor Who fan clubs across the globe deserve a salute.

Doctor Who celebrates difference. It includes different sexualities and cultures (though I would suggest an episode set in Australia… just saying) and the Doctor himself strives for harmony. What would he say about our fandom’s current state of events? Simple: NO MORE.

Step back in time...

COMMENT GUIDELINES

Please be civil and keep article comments relevant and on topic. Flag and report any offensive/trolling behavior, or contact us with details.
Please do not post SPOILERS including anything from leaked episodes! Your account could be banned. For complete details on our comment policy please read.
98 comments
Beasts_a_Snarling
Beasts_a_Snarling

Finally something personal! Well done. The most effective way to speak to the fandom is through a story that has a significance to all of us. This article is something we all can relate to. Fantastic!

Polyphase
Polyphase

Lovely article and great read.

Why would the show change the main actor for someone who’s babbling about new teeth? 

Love it :)

bl0ndie98
bl0ndie98

It seems weird to say that I've been a mad about doctor who for over half of my life, I'm 16. Woo!!

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

We all have our own joining and tipping points. I remember watching Tom Baker as a child, and being genuinely frightened (I even vaguely recall having a Jon Pertwee annual!) and I would have watched Peter Davison a bit, but less often until Bonnie Langford put me off completely! I then paid little attention to the show for over 20 years, not watching the TV movie or even S1 and S2, so curiously the first episode of New Who I saw was Smith and Jones! I've enjoyed the series since then, though interestingly it turned into more than something I watch on TV during S7 when Clara came on screen...

Richy Woo
Richy Woo

To everybody listed above, everybody who ever donated a moment of their life to making this show a reality, anybody who ever donated a singe penny of their herd earned money into creating this wonderful show. THANK YOU

allons_ywibblywobbly
allons_ywibblywobbly

Loving a tv show so deeply it's one of the greatest feelings in the world! I know it may sound silly to others ( I really can't understand people that don't watch tv shows), but there is nothing that compares with that tingling sensation in my heart when I rewatch something I love so much!

The8thDoctor
The8thDoctor

I fell out of love with the show when Tom Baker left.  I loved the 8th Doctor but,  alas,  he was a one off.  

RTD and Moffat have made great casting decisions and I am very confident for the future of Doctor Who.




TheOncomingStorm
TheOncomingStorm

Great article. "Dad explained why there was a new, younger man that was the Doctor but it didn’t feel right to me. I liked the old Doctor. Why would the show change the main actor for someone who’s babbling about new teeth? The Christmas Invasion I watched with arms crossed. When the Doctor was half asleep for most of it I was set that I wouldn’t like him when he woke up. Then he quoted The Lion King, grew a new hand and had won Rose’s trust again all in his pyjamas. Suddenly he wasn’t so bad." That is my exact experience of The Christmas Invasion, but within about two episodes Tennant was my favourite and now he always will be. "They were dark days. My mind kept on replaying his, “I don’t want to go” and I just wanted to shout at David Tennant, “Then why DID you!?”" I literally did exactly that. I started with Rose too, back in 2005 when I was 5. I thought it was pretty good. Look at me now.




CherylMyersCotter
CherylMyersCotter

I love Doctor Who because it reminds me of the original Star Trek that I grew up watching: that there are causes worth living and dying for, ideas worth believing in, and we do have a potential to grow beyond what we THINK we are.  In this dreary world it reminds me what a precious commodity hope is. Star Trek did that for my generation, and now Doctor Who is doing it for yours. Cheers :)

Piramids of Mars
Piramids of Mars

I started to watch doctor who when i was 2 because my dad wanted me to watch some of it and sine then I've been a huge fan.Even though I like the classic series more then the new I still like borh of them.

Mercy Reborn2
Mercy Reborn2

I started watching when I was three years old  I think it was a Patrick Troughton episode about 1966, and kept watching until the Colin Baker era. I think, really good shows  draw you back eventually, like doctor who. I think DW was the very first sci fi  I saw, it influenced me to read sci fi books. I think the show has a beneficial effect on people

babbitdukes
babbitdukes

I grew up not really watching Who, I do remember City of Death as a 13 year old. It was my ex husband who got me into it in a big way first episode The five Doctors after that I wanted to watch more, I remember collecting video's then as soon as dvd came out switching over to them.10 years ago left him, wondered would I want to bother again, saw new Who and started collecting again, I've always said I like all the Doctors all made some brilliant stories, others not so good. From me series 8 can't come quick enough.

JamesCresswell
JamesCresswell

I first started watching Doctor Who way back when Jon Pertwee was at the helm, but being very young at the time, all I remember was being scared witless.

When I got older and was able to appreciate the story, I was hooked. By then, Tom Baker was in the role and he will always be the definitive Doctor ( In my opinion )

When the series was canceled in the 80s I was crushed, but books, tapes, records and videos kept me going. 

Then the 1996 film came along. Even though Paul McGann was brilliant, the less said about the film itself, the better. Even though the film was rubbish, I was sure a series would follow. Alas it was not to be.

Then years later rumours started about Doctor Who being revived and hope sprang again. I was dubious if it would still contain the same magic for me, as it did when I was a child. 

Thankfully, the excellent Russell T Davies and co, didn't let me down. Doctor Who gave me the chills, everytime that theme music comes on and still does now. 

No, I don't agree with everything Moffat does with the series. However, it's because I love the programme, and don't want it to be canceled again. Same as everyone else. Besides, if we all agreed on how things are run, this would be a boring world.

So we the fans will always disagree on plots, characters and showrunners. But hey, that's life.

                                  

Whovian
Whovian

Despite being a massive fan of The Sarah Jane Adventures, I had never heard of Doctor Who. In the SJA episode The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith, I met the Doctor for the first time. This marvellous, mad man who travelled in blue box... who was he? And then, one Christmas day, I caught the end of A Christmas Carol- the part where Abigail is repeatedly taken out of storage. What was this show? I had idea what was happening but, in that instant, Doctor Who captured my imagination. It was so crazy and impossible that I adored it immediately. And so began my love affair with the greatest show in the Universe.

TARDlSkey
TARDlSkey

What a lovely article to read upon waking up! I completely agree, and we seem to share a similar experience!

MeglosProductions
MeglosProductions

Great article. There's many reasons why I love Doctor Who:

The unique premise

The character of the Doctor

The companions

The show's never ending ability to scare kids (especially in the Hinchcliffe era)

The monsters

Regeneration

etc.

MetamorphmagusWho
MetamorphmagusWho

Well done and great article! There are so many reasons why I love Doctor Who that I don't even know where to start! The amazing characters and stories, the unique aliens, civilisations and planets, the creativeness of the writers, the talent of the directors, the humour, drama, romance etc, the complexity of it all and just the fact that so much effort is evidently put into the show.


I was only young when Series 1 was first broadcast so I didn't really know what was happening at the time. I remember being scared of several things ; the autons, the gas mask zombies, and even the reveal of the slitheen (not so much the actual slitheen themselves, just the reveal) but I guess I was largely intrigued by it since I'd never seen anything else like it.


Thanks, Doctor Who, for giving me so many memories that I will cherish forever (yes, I do realise that was incredibly cheesy, but I don't care).

awkward912
awkward912

I must have missed this "crisis".

The11thRising
The11thRising

Well said! I rarely comment on articles as there can be so much negativity in them. It's good to see that there is a really positive one. It is the greatest show on the planet, and its made not just for us fans, but for as wide an audience as possible, and since its return in 2005, has grown bigger and bigger across the world. 


Lets just celebrate its success, and accept the amazing ride the show takes us. I for one cannot wait to see what comes next with the 12th Doctor, this will be the eighth time I will be getting to know a new Doctor. Deep Breath, and hold on tight people!

allons_ywibblywobbly
allons_ywibblywobbly

The truth is that "Doctor Who" is like no other show! I watch and love many many shows, but the love I have for Doctor Who it's really unique. I can't really explain why and I don't even need to.

My Doctor is Tennant, but believe me when I say I love all of them! I admit I didn't watch many of the classic episodes (though this summer I want to fix that :p), but I have so much respect and admiration for each actor that played the Doctor! I embrace change very easily now, I understand the concept of the show and no matter what new actors, writers, stories will be in the future, I will always be a whovian. I introduced it to my dad too, who now is an obsessed fan (I regret nothing :)))  I really hope one day to show it to my children. I think that's an experience that no other show could have.

The Finn
The Finn

Thank you. Just... thank you.

Arkleseizure
Arkleseizure

People often ask me when I fell in love with Doctor Who. I can't answer that. My earliest, dimmest memories of Doctor Who, in the early 80s, the Davison years, when I was a tiny little boy, are of me being intrigued by this programme my dad loved. I don't remember Adric (at the time), but I remember remembering Adric. I remember wondering where the dark-haired girl (long hair meant girl to me when I was four) had gone.

I suppose it was the Five Doctors that really grabbed me. Cybermen, Daleks, Yetis and that wonderful silver creature that could vanish and appear elsewhere immediately, together with sightings of Dad's fondly-remembered Pat and Jon. I loved Pat. How I wished I'd been there at the time. How I still wish I could see more of him in action. How I rejoiced last year when The Enemy of the World found a home on my iPad's hard drive. Knowing all about past Doctors I was ready to say goodbye. I would miss Peter, my first Doctor, but I looked forward to the next.

I shared Dad's disappointment in Colin Baker's Doctor. Something was wrong. With hindsight, I can see what Colin meant to do, and how the scripts and that idiotic costume undermined him. But I wasn't sorry to see him go. Sylvester got off to a weak start, but still: he was my Doctor. I'd vote for Pat, Tom and Matt above him as best Doctor, but Sylvester was my Doctor. That fascinating little man, the spoon-playing little man who turned out to be a ruthless schemer given half a chance was, as Dad happily acknowledged, yet another fascinating take on the part.

But then it was gone. How I hated being the teenage Doctor Who fan in the ninties. Today, I divide my classmates among those who saw it as a daft affectation and the hateful bullies who mercilessly ridiculed it. Now I laugh with the former, who cheerfully admit they were wrong. I've had the latter admit it too, but so what? Why should I care that they approve? If anything, their approval makes me think the maybe there's something fundamentally wrong with Doctor Who that I just can't put my finger on.

Never mind. The American attempt at a relaunch came and went (I didn't dislike it), but then came the reboot. Other lifelong fans turned against the reboot, and I felt a need to defend the proper revival. Some of them would rather have remained a niche group, listening to audios and reading books, but I was eager for the show to find a new audience. It worked better than I could have hoped. Eccles was gone so soon, but Doctor Who was back. I enjoyed the change to David Tennant, and enthusiastically followed him, but was still thrilled to meet the eleventh. To my mind, Matt channelled Pat and Tom perfectly, and stands alongside them as one of the very best. I now find myself defending Moffat to RTD fans in the same way I once defended their hero to the old-school fans.

(RTD's ideas are not sacred. Moffat had as much right to bring Gallifrey back as RTD had to destroy it in the first place.)

The Day of the Doctor was the triumphant vindication of all things Who. Sitting in the Bournemouth ABC, surrounded by hordes of fellow fans, watching John Hurt's weary old soldier joining the ranks of the Doctor was the perfect feeling. How we all applauded at the sight of Capaldi's eyes. How we gasped at that familiar voice in the gallery.

That constant re-invention is why I love Doctor Who. However much things change, they always stay the same. Try watching the Krotons and the Ambassadors of Death back-to-back. Just one year apart, but they could hardly be more different. Except, in each case, there's a wise alien with moral drive ensuring that right prevails.

Doctor Who is science. It's history. It's magic, adventure, fantasy. It's about people and planets. It's about whatever it wants to be about. A world where fiction becomes real? Okay. A malevolent Billy Bunter with a death-trap board game? Why not? Green slime that turns people into raging beasts, or another that produces giant maggots? We can do both! We can remake the Prisoner of Zenda in space and have aliens commit art thefts. We can race galleons through space, turn people into trees and make psychopathic robots out of sweets. The possibilities are limitless, and that's why I love Doctor Who.

mgm1229
mgm1229

Not long after my mom passed away, I got snowed in during a blizzard in NYC. BBC America had all the new Who Xmas episodes, as well as a bunch of early Matt episodes, available on demand. I had seen Rose when first broadcast and it didn't ring for me at that time. But snowed in, and missing my mom desperately, I began watching; hours later, I was hooked., hard. And I didn't realize it until much later, but finding this complex, intelligent, often hilarious show became a salve for my soul, something beyond my sadness to focus on. I am grateful you reminded us of the many people who work so hard and so well to bring us worthy television.

TheDoctorIsInDaHouse
TheDoctorIsInDaHouse

In 2009- young me was told about  this show that had gone on for years- then went, then came back for 4 more years. That show was doctor who! My mum and dad got series 4 up on iplayer after it had been running on bbc 3. I lapped it up! It was awesome! I remember the moment I saw a Matt Smith series 5 trailer as it wasn't David Tennant. My parents weren't whovians but they explained the concept of regeneration and i was so excited about it! I sat down to watch every episode of series 5 on Saturday nights and enjoyed so much- the ideas were amazing and the episodes were brilliant. Matt Smith soon became my favourite doctor. Then in 2011 I found this wonderful thing called dr who magazine wich I read month after month after month. Then there was series 6- I remember watching A Good Man Goes To War with my mouth wide open- then there was the wait. In that wait I lapped up filming pics from series 6 part 2 and watched every interview. Then came 2012- no doctor who for 9 months! Matt Smith was at his best and I was loving this brilliant show- enthralled in it- and then there was Doctor Who TV! I could read things written by other whovians and keep up and get excited by news of upcoming episodes. And since then I have been obsessed with this little show- loving every second of it! When the 50th anniversary came around i went back and watched the classics even more- and how brilliant are they? Yes there cheesy but they are brilliant! This year Peter Capaldi looks awesome and series 8 is set to be the best series of new who. Thank you doctor who for being awesome! :) 

LucasW
LucasW

I don't remember my first encounter with Doctor Who, I was born back when there was no Who on the telly and as such was brought up on a very healthy diet of repeats on UKTV gold. The show has just always... Been there for me. But I can't think of a better thing to grow up with!

G_Unitt
G_Unitt

I've never loved a TV programme as much as I love Doctor Who. I had typed a big thing about it, but I think that's all that needs to be said. It's a programme that teaches us so much, that I think the world would be a lesser place without it. DOCTOR WHO, MAY YOU LIVE FOREVER.


TracyPalma
TracyPalma

I watch it because it's fun. I started watching Doctor Who 2 years ago, so I have no warm and fuzzy memories associated with it. I'm the only one in my family that watches it regularly. I don't try and extract any deep philosophical meanings from it and I'm not really a sci-fi person, so I don't watch Star Trek or any of that. Like I said, I watch it because it's a fun show. I tried watching it way back when it used to be aired on PBS, but none of it made any sense to me. It just looked cheesy and low budget and I kept waiting for the Doctor to take his coat and scarf off and he never did. It was confusing, so I turned it off for like, 30 years or so. I finally gave it a second chance a couple years back and much to my chagrin, I've fallen in love with it. I generally never sit and analyze a tv show or a movie while in the middle of watching it. If I feel like it later I will, after I've had time to think on it and mull things over, but  I've never really tried to extract any deep meaning from Doctor Who, mostly because I don't really care to. I've never had any issue with regeneration; I mean it's sad to see once you've gotten attached to a particular Doctor and all, but it's not been anything traumatic for me.

Night at the Whovies
Night at the Whovies

Main Reason for Crisis: Doctor Who Withdrawal Syndrome. For those who are tired of re-watching the ___ of the doctor trilogy along with classic episodes. Doctor Who would normally start around about now, but the whoniverse now has to wait another month. The teaser trailers are a nice touch though along with articles like this that remind us why we are all here!

ClaireAbraham
ClaireAbraham

You know why we are in crisis?


We are bored. I became a Whovian about this time last year, and in the interim we've had a grand total of TWO new episodes.  Grant you, they were both big event episodes, but between them and all the mini-episodes that came with them, there was a grand total of about 2 1/2 hours of new entertainment. 


When Capaldi arrives, everybody will stop whining and rehashing old stuff and begin debating the new, and we'll all feel a lot better.

YaelMoise
YaelMoise



I have a problem with people who have a problem with people who have a problem with change in Doctor Who (Try saying that 4 times quickly). 

I don't mean the article - which was an absolute joy to read - but some of the comments I read here and have read elsewhere on this subject. Struggling with change in Doctor Who isn't something you need to overcome, and it's not a flaw, and it's not necessarily a disqualifying quality in a Whovian.

I'll admit I myself had the odd trepidation when Matt Smith was announced as the new Doctor. I watched some of his previous work before they announced him, so I knew who he was, and, well... I really wasn't very happy about him. But he won me over within those precious seconds at the end of The End of Time ("Nose? I've... had... worse"). So much so, in fact, that I still consider him the one light in an episode I utterly detest (I'm sorry, but I agree with an article someone posted here a while back picking that ending apart. Especially that bit where 10th implies that 11th isn't the same man he is, but is actually someone else. Really didn't like TEoT). 

To my mind, issues with change are part and parcel of being human... even if you're a Whovian. 

I didn't have any with Capaldi, but that has more to do with my faith in him as a life-long Whovian, as well as a first rate actor, than with anything else. 

There's nothing wrong with having issues with change, or with worrying that the new guy will be rubbish. 

It's at packing up and leaving because of it, or not giving it a chance... that's where people get it wrong. 

---

I love Doctor Who... well, because it's an excellent show... and because I have a bit of a crush on the Doctor (and I don't mean just the latest younger models)... and because I'm a certifiable Anglophile... and a dedicated sci-fi geek and history nerd... but also, I love Doctor Who because Doctor Who is a living breathing discussion in Buddhist philosophy versus Hindu concepts. 

For me, the Doctor is a visual experiment in Atman versus Anatman: Is there a grain of constancy in us as we shift from one changed state to another, or are we nothing more than an increasingly complicated "combination" that should only be identified by a name as a matter of convenience, but is in such a state of flux that any substantial name would be inappropriate for it. 

Basically - Is there a "Doctorness" to the Doctor? Does remembering being someone else constitute being that someone else still? Is there a constant? Is there... in the end... a Doctor? 

To put it plainly, Doctor Who caters to ever level of my mind - From the earthy to the ethereal. 

Oh, and as a student of religious groups, I really do enjoy observing the similarities between Whovians and members of a proselytizing religious group. ;) 

So, really... what's not to love. ;) 






Malohkeh
Malohkeh

My dad is English, and when he found out Doctor Who was back he tried to get the rest of the family to start watching (although for some reason, he chose Love and Monsters to introduce us).

Notsosmartguy
Notsosmartguy

Another reason I love doctor who is that me and my dad have something we can watch together. I get the impression that a lot of people got into doctor who because of their parents but for me it was the opposite. My dad saw me watching doctor who on BBC America on the day of the Doctor and was interested in watching it with me. Me and him caught a lot of series 7b episodes (though we missed a few because I helped him with the yard work). We watched the day of the Doctor together on t.v. which will be a personal favorite memory of mine. After that we went through the rest of new who together and I enjoyed sharing something with him like he shared a lot of things with me. I bet when I'm older I'll be looking back at this time fondly and be sharing this show with my own kids (if I have kids).

The8thDoctor
The8thDoctor

@Piramids of Mars one of my first memories was my brother and father making me watch Jon Pertwee change into Tom Baker,  it blew my 3 year old mind.

cassini
cassini

how amazing to be introduced to the Doctor through his greatest companion, as if he were a spin-off of her show. must've been mindblowing, discovering this humongous universe that SJA was part of. i hope you've gone back and watched Sarah Jane's original run too!

Beasts_a_Snarling
Beasts_a_Snarling

"Doctor Who is science. It's history. It's magic, adventure, fantasy. It's about people and planets. It's about whatever it wants to be about. A world where fiction becomes real? Okay. A malevolent Billy Bunter with a death-trap board game? Why not? Green slime that turns people into raging beasts, or another that produces giant maggots? We can do both! We can remake the Prisoner of Zenda in space and have aliens commit art thefts. We can race galleons through space, turn people into trees and make psychopathic robots out of sweets. The possibilities are limitless, and that's why I love Doctor Who."

That. That. That was the best paragraph in the history of paragraphs....

MetamorphmagusWho
MetamorphmagusWho

@TheDoctorIsInDaHouse  Matt Smith's my favourite doctor as well. I don't really understand when people say he was too childish as in my opinion some of his best moments were when he was serious. His era of the show had just the right balance of light and dark moments and, dare I say it, Series 6 is one of my favourite series not only because it holds a special place in my heart (wow, I'm full of cheesiness today) but also because I love the story arc used. So many questions! So much speculation!

floppy_who
floppy_who

This article shows that nothing changes. Long term fans my age (I can just about remember watching the end of The Time Warrior) who read this will be smiling. Just like Pauline's dad, we've seen the series change many times ( in terms of look, the lead actor and the time of year which the show goes out) and as with life in General, one of the few certainties is change.

Personally, the show for me will always be an autumn / winter event, mainly as growing up with the series in the 70s and 80s the series would start in either early September or January and then run for between 3 and 6 months. I encourage all nu-whovians that haven't experienced a full autumn / winter series to give it a go. You probably won't want it in the spring again....

As with anything in life, keep an open mind (and don't set standards in your imagination that are so high that no matter how good something is, it's still a disappointment when it happens) and everything will be fine.. That ethos has kept me with the show since 1973 ( even through the shocks of the first JNT series and the TV movie dalek voices....)

NeutronFlow
NeutronFlow

@ClaireAbraham Hello Claire, nice to meet you! 

Don't be bored. There's a fifty year back catalogue for you to explore! 

I sometimes envy more recent Who fans and the massive goody-bag of treats that await them :)




Notsosmartguy
Notsosmartguy

@YaelMoise interesting views :-) I myself find change to be doctor who's ability to change and reinvent it's greatest strength. I think some fans don't appreciate the fact that this show doesn't fall into the trap of doing the same dam thing over and over again. Also on a personal note I like how the show allows me to see through a different view without really stepping or offending my own faith. (I know it's a weird thing to say but understanding different viewpoints is important).

G_Unitt
G_Unitt

@NeutronFlow @ClaireAbraham I envy fans who got to watch every episode as it was released! I can't imagine watching Genesis of the Daleks for the first time as it came out, and be able to discuss it with everyone ... But hey, maybe people will say that about The Day of the Doctor one day!

floppy_who
floppy_who

Not only was it awesome watching the classic series as it was transmitted, it was very rare to know what was coming up in the series as there was no internet or DWM to give hints and drop spoilers before transmission. That's what I miss most now.

floppy_who
floppy_who

Genesis of the Daleks scared the heck out of me in 1975. But then, I was very young at the time....