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Why “Time” was the Perfect Summary of Smith’s Era

Guest contributor Connor Johnston gives his opinion on Smith’s swan song.

The Time of the Doctor Poster – Easter Eggs & Clues

And so the time came where the Eleventh Doctor was to bid farewell to the fans one last time. An episode that promised it would do justice to the Doctor we’d all grown to love in his 4 years as our favourite renegade Time Lord. The episode also promised to answer all the questions that the fans had been asking since “The Eleventh Hour”. And with the Weeping Angels, the Daleks, the Silence and the Cybermen all to feature in the special, this was set to be the most difficult challenge the Time Lord had ever faced… This was to be “The Time of the Doctor

Now that a few months have passed, and we’ve all had a chance to rewatch the episode once or twice (or 17 times) and have had a decent chance to digest it, I thought it best to look at how “The Time of the Doctor” succeeded (at least in this humble contributor’s mind) to pay tribute to the entire era of the Eleventh Doctor, from the music to the dialogue – Why “Time” was the perfect summary of Matt Smith’s Era.

The Music

time-doctor-regen-handMurray Gold is a musical legend. There are no ifs or buts about it. One need only look back at what this man has done for Doctor Who since its revival in 2005 – the composer for every episode and every special in each series. During the first four series of the show, Murray Gold shone with classics like “Vale Decem”, “All the Strange, Strange Creatures” and “This is Gallifrey” as they breathed life into the Doctor’s adventures. As the show matured, so did the music and it was when Matt Smith’s era begun that Murray Gold took full advantage of how the soundtrack could define a show. The Eleventh Hour was the first to include “I am the Doctor” which has gone on to be one of, if not the most iconic “Doctor-ish” piece of music of all time. It would be foolish to say that the music of Doctor Who hasn’t been a strong highlight of Matt’s Era, with unforgettable tracks like “Trenzalore” and “Together or not all” or musically defined episodes like “A Christmas Carol” or “The Rings of Akhaten” adding so much more emotion to every moment of an episode. ‘Time’ is no stranger to yet another brilliant score paying tributes to the musical highlights of the last four years, with a few more “I am the Doctor” variations, all cultivating to a brilliantly chosen “Infinite Potential” melody from “The Rings of Akhaten” – a piece so well suited to the regeneration, one wonders if that was Gold’s intention when originally writing the score from the episode it originates from.

Rest now…..my warrior.
Rest now, hardship is over.
Live. Wake up. Wake up.
And let the cloak, of life – cling to your bones. Cling to your bones.
Wake up, wake up.

The Monsters      

time-of-the-doctor-tv-trailer-(5) silentEchoing the words of Madame De Pompadour, “The monsters and the Doctor, it seems you cannot have one without the other.” And boy oh boy did we have monsters! Throughout his time as the Doctor, Matt Smith did battle many foes, the more iconic ones including the Weeping Angels, the Daleks, the Cybermen, the Silence, the Silurians, the Ice Warriors and the Great Intelligence. It seemed fitting then that for the end of his days he would once again face every enemy he had ever encountered, as they all followed the bell to Trenzalore. I say ‘all’ even though we did only see a small portion of what was whizzing about above the planet at anyone time – who’s to say there weren’t spaceships full of Chloe Webbers, Abzorbaloffs and Vinvocci? Maybe all together in one ship! Oh Lord imagine the fan-fiction…. Even the Sontaran’s made a short cameo obviously to appease to the children, that once again portrayed them in a comical light – Cue complaints… now!

I for one think that Time delivered brilliantly on the enemy criteria, managing to include some of the greatest villains of all time in a way that wasn’t ‘unnecessary’ like some have labelled it, but that served a real threat to the Doctor, and a real purpose to show the seriousness of the situation, and I don’t believe anything could be more threatening than legion upon legion of monsters, sparked by a fear so great that they would do anything to ‘Exterminate’ it.

The Arcs

crack-time-of-the-doctorSeries 5-7 had been very heavily driven by plot twists, story arcs and questions riddled throughout. Steven Moffat distinctly made his mark on the show by introducing long-lasting arcs to add an exciting and wonderfully frustrating experience as fans. Years of speculation and theories would inhabit our mind – to which I personally thank Steven for, as it kept Doctor Who ticking over in our tiny little heads constantly even during the Dark Ages* (*times without Doctor Who!) Since the Eleventh Doctor’s very first adventure, we were introduced to many story arcs that would last until the end of his era. “The cracks in the universe”, “Doctor Who?”, “Silence Will Fall,” “The Death of the Doctor” and “The Impossible Girl” were the main mysteries that featured during the Eleventh Doctor’s tenure.

It seems somewhat ironic, yet at the same time so perfect, that after years of questions and mysteries Matt Smith’s final bow was chock-a-block full of answers! So what were some of the things we learn (or in some cases what was re-affirmed) in “The Time of the Doctor”?

  • What were the cracks in the skin of the universe? The cracks were caused by the TARDIS exploding, and was perfectly described by Matt: “That’s a tiny sliver of the 26th of June, 2010. The day the universe blew up.” . The cracks were the weakest points in the universe, and the perfect place to try to break back into it! Which is exactly what Gallifrey was trying to do! All they needed was for the Doctor to answer the question, to serve as a gateway and in they pop!
  • What is “The Silence” and why must it ‘fall’? The Silence was a religious order that devoted themselves to one cause – Silence: that the Doctor would never speak his name. This was because if the Time Lords did return, even thought they would arrive in peace, they would be met with a war as all of their enemies sat in the skies above – ready for them. The Question must never be answered, Silence MUST Fall – If not for the Fatuous Egotist … then for the peace.
  • Who Blew Up the TARDIS? During the Endless Bitter “Stalemate War” on the fields of Trenzalore, that lasted for centuries and centuries, there was one woman who decided to take matters into her own hands. Madame Kovarian (Bless her cotton socks) and her Rogue Chapter of the Church of the Silence decided if they traveled back along the Doctor’s timeline and prevented him from ever reaching Trenzalore – the whole war could be avoided. They blew up the Doctor’s TARDIS, and in turn created the very cracks in the universe through which the Time Lords made contact. The destiny trap… “You can change history if you’re apart of it”.
  • Why do people forget the creatures of the Silence when they look away? The creatures of the Silence were Confessional Priests, who were genetically modified to make the confessor forget anything they told them – Nifty trick I know! Imagine if one went rogue! What evil they could…. oh
  • Doctor who? **Channels Inner-Coleman** You’ve been asking a question, and it’s time someone told you you’ve been getting it wrong. His name, his name is the Doctor. All the name he needs. Everything you need to know about him. Case closed.

A  Strong Guest Cast

doctor-who-time-of-the-doctor-batch-c-(2)Apart from the main reoccurring cast since 2010, there have been many exceptional actors and actresses that have had guest roles during the Eleventh Doctor’s era. To name a few standouts: who could forget Tony Curran’s incredibly moving role as Vincent van Gogh; Michael Gambon’s beautiful transition from a stern old Scrooge to a warm-hearted, changed man; Suranne Jones’ captivating portrayal of the TARDIS in human form; Celia Imrie’s cold and villainous Kizlet; and of course, the super mother/daughter acting team of Dame Diana Rigg and Rachael Stirling as the totally bonkers Mrs Gillyflower and her daughter Ada respectively.

“The Time of the Doctor” continues its tradition of such a strong and scene stealing guest cast that truly do define the episode. The first is Jack Hollington, who like many young Doctor Who stars (Caitlin Blackwood and Emilia Jones spring to mind) provides a touching performance well beyond his years, of the young boy Barnable, who constantly looks ups to the Doctor, and reminds the viewers how much impact the Doctor can have on the lives of children, and vice versa – what an impact the children can have on him. The second noteworthy guest star is of course the stunning Orla Brady as the Papal Mainframe of the Church of the Silence, the ever flirtatious and mysterious Tasha Lem. Orla brings so much chaos and fun to the role, it’s very difficult not to instantly fall in love with her. How she holds such authority so entertainingly in every scene is a real testament to her acting abilities and really is a highlight for the episode.

The Nods to the Past

amy-time-regen-smithSince the very first episode of Series 5 , it’s been evident Steven Moffat wanted to include many nods to the ‘history’ of the show during Matt’s era, from the first 11 faces of the Doctor being projected by the Atraxi, to the spine-tingling opening scene of “Name” as Clara, the impossible girl infested the Doctor’s timeline, much to the audience’s delight. One needs only listen to the dialog passed around during Series 7 Part 2 to find little references here and there (“My grandaughter”, HADS, Metebelis III, “gobby Australian”), let alone a viewing of “The Day of the Doctor” possibly the greatest love letter to the history of Doctor Who imaginable. It comes with a sad, sad realization that now-Matt’s era is also concreted into the past and the history of Doctor Who, no longer being lived out in front us. And so many nods to the recent past were also included in Time.

Here are my personal top 4:

  • Behind the Scenes
    The wardrobe department would have had an absolute ball creating Clara’s COOL Cardigan, dotted with Bowties – a direct tie to one of Matt’s well known catch phrases, as well as dusting off Matt’s previous costume from the last Christmas Special “The Snowmen” . Another tribute to Matt’s time in the TARDIS were the children’s drawings appearing throughout the episode of the 11th Doctor’s victories both in Trenzalore and beyond.
  • River Song
    Even though Alex Kingston didn’t appear in the episode itself, a small comment from the Doctor was enough to send me into a hysterical display of emotion, and to prove what a magnificent part Melody had in the 11th Doctor’s life
  • Fish Fingers and Custard
    The scene that made so many fall in love with this strange new man in “Davey Baby’s” costume was echoed in the final moments of the episode, as OUR Doctor felt the need to have one last  taste of his favourite dish, knowing full well his taste buds might never crave it again! One can only hope that Capaldi will be curious enough for a taste… “This tastes like ******* sheep’s *****”
  • Amelia Williams
    Simultaneously all around the world, our eyes lit up and our hearts tore in two as Karen Gillian paraded right on straight ahead to her Raggedy Doctor, reminding us of all the times the Doctor had shared with the Ponds, the family we grew to love. He started as her imaginary friend, and in the end, she become his, finishing this little old bedtime story…. “Raggedy ManGoodnight

Tear-jerking Moments

time-clara-crack-sadThroughout the 50 year history of Doctor Who, there have been moments that have broken us all. From William Hartnell’s heartfelt farewell speech to Susan, to Jon Pertwee driving into the night after Jo’s decision to leave him. Emotion is what defines Doctor Who from other “sci-fi” shows, the heartbreak being as important as the aliens as a core ingredient to the success of the show for over half a century. And no era has been more filled with tears and tissues than that of the Eleventh Doctor.

I believe it’s safe to say that the Eleventh Doctor era has been definitely the most emotionally invested than any other era before it, with many moments like the Doctor taking Vincent to the the Musée d’Orsay, Idris finding her word, Amelia’s last farewell or River’s Songs ‘goodbye sweetie’, enough to throw fans everywhere into hysterics. “The Time of the Doctor” has no shortage of its own tear-jerking moments- keeping with tradition!

 From about the midway point, it’s very clear this episode it getting very sad, very fast- moments like “The Deletion of Handles,” “Clara reunites with the aged Doctor” and basically every second of the last 10 minutes piercing the sharp dagger of Moffat into our already weeping hearts! It here I’d like to highlight Jenna’s magnificent performance, as it became clear that she was losing her Doctor, and more importantly – Her friend, which posed the question, maybe some real life emotions became visible through her dialogue.

The Epic 11 Speeches

matt-smith-time-regen-towerIt’s no secret that when Matt Smith delivers an incredible speech, it leaves everyone with goosebumps. He has this ability that ensures every audience member sits in silence, usually with their mouths open wide in awe, hanging on every single word that he delivers and the passion that he delivers them with. Some absolutely EPIC examples are his Pandorica Speech, the belief and power during his speech to House as the TARDIS Matrix takes back control, and the stunning speech to Grandfather during “The Rings of Akhaten”. In ‘Time’, the epic moments on the clocktower continue to show us how much a few words from the mouth of this brilliant and passionate man make our knees shake and our spine’s tingle!

We cannot forget however that some speeches don’t have to be epic and “explody” to have an impact – especially not Matt’s! Looking back at the more touching and gentler speeches of the Eleventh Doctor we have the emotional speech during “The Big Bang” dubbed as, “We’re all stories in the End,” the beautiful speech to Stormageddon or ‘Alfie’ during “Closing Time” and of course his ‘story’ to Merry in “The Rings of Akhaten” – This one’s my favorite, I admit, and not just because of the Alice in Wonderland reference. Every human being is unique –‘one of a kind’, and unbelievably lucky to be here. We’re only here for a short while, which means that every moment of our lives is precious and should be lived in the best way possible. The Doctor understands this. There is no person who isn’t important. There’s no such thing as little people. Each one of us is worth protecting, is worth saving. The Doctor’s final regeneration speech about breath on a mirror, is another of these “subtle” but moving speeches of Matt’s, and along with the epic ‘explody’ clocktower speech- shows us exactly who the Eleventh Doctor is.

Poetry in Writing

Moffat’s episodes are no stranger to rhymes and poetry, the “Dr Seuss” of Doctor Who one might say! Cast your mind back to the most innocent (not) poem of “The Beast Below,” or the climaxing moments of “A Good Man Goes to War,” or even the haunting words of Clarence in “The Name of the Doctor” to truly  appreciate how words and rhymes have affected us so much throughout this era. “The Time of the Doctor” nears its close with a beautiful yet heartbreakingly relevant poem “An extract from thoughts on a Clock”

And now it’s time for one last bow, like all your other selves.
Eleven’s hour is over now.
The clock is striking twelve’s.

Not to forget the final yet most important thing Time reminded us of… The Brilliant, Unforgettable, and Outstanding Matthew Robert Smith                     

And so we have it: “The Time of the Doctor” and why it was in my view it was “The Perfect Summary of the Smith Era”!  Finally, if you honestly couldn’t find one thing about “The Time of the Doctor” that you enjoyed then I hope this article has opened your mind to what a sensational swansong it was in at least one way. The clock is striking Twelve’s and a new era has begun, but we will never forget 11!

Step back in time...

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162 comments
TriviaMaster
TriviaMaster

"The creatures of the Silence were Confessional Priests, who were genetically modified to make the confessor forget anything they told them – Nifty trick I know! Imagine if one went rogue! What evil they could…. oh"


I agree that TotD was a great episode, but this was the one part that I thought felt a little forced...firstly, I'm not quite sure why you would want to forget what you confessed...the entire point of confession, in the Catholic church at least (who knows about those alien religions though :)) is to feel forgiven of your sins, so what's the point of going to confession if you don't even remember you've gone? Secondly, (and this was my main issue with that explanation) why would your genetically engineered priests need to be able to shoot lightning out of their fingers?

DW_girl
DW_girl

I really enjoyed the article, and 'The Time of the Doctor' for that matter. Until recently, my main nig about the episode was that I didn't understand certain things, but now it's all been explained for me, I can sit back and watch the episode properly and enjoy it for what it is. A beautifully written masterpiece.

ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe
ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe

Thank you! Pleased to see an article full of TTOTD-praise. Looking back at the majority of reactions back in December, it's great to know that people grew to like it since then, as witnessed by the results of the recent Best of Matt Smith polls.

DawnTime
DawnTime

Lovely write up thank you

JonathanMitchell2
JonathanMitchell2

The first time I watched 'Time of the Doctor' I thought it sucked, but when I watched it the second time I loved it, Matt's Finale was really good. 

VortexDan
VortexDan

It was ALSO a perfect example of the bad plotting and pacing, vague story arcs,  sexism, wrong characterization of the Doctor, helpless Companions, cookie cutter side character (esp. women see:sexism), ruining of monsters, horrific pay offs,  references to random bits of the past while mishandling the bits the writer didn't like,  and use of sexual harassment for comedy that has plagued Smith's era getting worse and worse from series to series. Yes, "Time" had some the good bits; but by GOD did it have all of bad bits ruining the good stuff for us

thatscottishguy
thatscottishguy

And also... if the doctor was unable to regenerate without a new cycle of regenerations.. then how did he begin to regenerate after being shot by River Song in "the impossible astronaut"???

I mean come on Moffat, get with the programme.

thatscottishguy
thatscottishguy

honestly... im just glad that matt smith is gone, and im excited to have Capaldi enter the show... and hopefullly start it afresh, with the tackiness and weirdness of matt smith's time forgotten with.

Polyphase
Polyphase

I thought it was too similar to The Pandorica Opens

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

An excellent article, and you argue your case very passionately!



While there are many great things about the episode, I'm still not entirely happy with TOTD


1) The timing is far too rushed, trying to close 3 years of arcs, giver Matt a good sendoff and provide some Christmas fun in one hour was too much.This really needed to be a 2 parter.


2) Having barely mentioned the Crack and Silence in S7, it was a bit of a jump back to return to the arcs of 2010 and 2011 2 years earlier! 


3) The Doctor Clara relationship seemed odd when compared with the really close bond between them at the end of DOTD; the way the Doctor sent Clara away twice, and seemingly without regret didn't rung true to me, it all seemed very matter of fact, you never saw any indication of pain or regret in the Doctor's eyes when he did it, especially the second time.


4) The Daleks being destroyed by the regeneration energy, but not the whole town and its inhabitants seemed a bit too convenient...

DaftDalek
DaftDalek

It's totally a good episode that gets better after repeated views. But the pacing was well, whatever, the thousnads of plot elements reduced its emotional impact at least the first time and most of the enemies were misused, especially the Daleks, again...

Liana21
Liana21

This is why i love so much Time, because is practically all the things that made me fall in love with Matt in a nutshell. By the way, You remember that I had a new incarnation of the owner of Rex debuting, if Series 8 is the half good that Rex's Series 16 is being, it's going to be epic.



lp229
lp229

I have yet to watch 'Time of the Doctor' again. I remember, though, being quite disappointed with it on Christmas day. In general, the story had an excellent concept base but was poorly executed. I felt that Moffat sold us short in the way he resolved the 'Silence will fall' arc. Here are some of the points that do not make sense to me. Why would the silence blow up the TARDIS if it would result in the end of the universe? This was the very thing that they were trying to avoid in preventing another potential Time War if the Time Lords managed to escape the pocket universe. Furthermore, how did they do it? The TARDIS is one of the most sophisticated ships in the universe that is virtually indestructible when it is fully functioning, so how were the silence able to hijack it and blow it up? The idea of the silents as confessional priests is an interesting one, but it doesn't fit well with their history. Why would a race of confessional priests essentially invade earth and enslave humanity, murdering people in the process, (TIA/DOM) when their quarrel was with the Doctor all along? Some other details that I didn't like include Tasha Lem apparently being able to control herself despite being a dalek puppet which doesn't conform to their introduction in 'Asylum of the Daleks'. The wooden Cyberman was daft and overly indulgent on Moffat's part. Anatomically and strategically, it doesn't make sense why a Cyberman would be made of this flammable and brittle material. Although I liked the Doctor's final regeneration scene, the moment when the he receives a new regeneration cycle and destroys the Dalek ships in the process was ridiculously convenient. Finally, I don't believe there was a need to make this episode Christmas themed. Doing so only made it gimmicky and unnessarily softened the dark potential of the story.  




Baker Street is excited for Series 8!
Baker Street is excited for Series 8!

Off topic, I know, but does anyone else find it odd to think that this time a year ago, viewers in the UK were 15 minutes into The Bells of Saint John? How time flies.

Amy is Hannibal
Amy is Hannibal

@TriviaMaster  1. The Silents can also use post-hypnotic suggestion, so it's likely that they can tell the confessors to forget their sins and feel absolved, so as soon as they look away, they will, and won't have any memory of having had to confess. Clean and simple. Or, alternatively (and this ties into my upcoming second point), "confession" in this case is a euphemism for "interrogation." 2. It's a military church. The clerics have guns. The priests have lightning, which they use for offense and possibly torture, if the "confession = interrogation" interpretation is held to be true.



Notsosmartguy approves of female thor
Notsosmartguy approves of female thor

" Moffateer"? Is that really a thing? But if you don't like you don't like it :-). I feel the same way about the story arcs of series 4 and 6 and the end of time(worst episode IMO).

DW_girl
DW_girl

@VortexDan The plot was explained; the pacing wasn't that bad; I agree the story in the episode was vague but I think too much story would confuse the episode way too much; What sexism? Clara was a brilliant character here; The Doctor was perfectly characterised; Clara maybe was helpless at one point but through no fault of her own, plus then she saved The Doctor; I didn't like Tasha too in all honesty- an example of the stereotypical Moffat female character; The monsters weren't ruined at all, but the Sontarans were diminished to childishness again; The pay offs were a bit rushed but they can be explained; I don't see any of this mishandling in the episode to be honest; what sexual harrassment? Tasha was flirting with The Doctor so she kinda asked for it. 

Just my opinions/counter-opinions to your thoughts....

ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe
ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe

@thatscottishguy "if the doctor was unable to regenerate without a new cycle of regenerations.. then how did he begin to regenerate after being shot by River Song in "the impossible astronaut"???"




If I could have a penny every time somebody comes here and asks this question, I would have been a millionaire by now. Do people even, you know, actually watch the show?

TheDreamer
TheDreamer

He wasnt regenerating, he was in the Tesselecta pretending to be regenerating... Tesselecta special effects made to look like regeneration energy.

sontaran17
sontaran17

@Polyphase  In what way? I can literally find no similarities besides: Matt Smith starred as the Doctor

Amy is Hannibal
Amy is Hannibal

@lp229   "Why would the silence blow up the TARDIS if it would result in the end of the universe?"


- It was meant to be an ironic backfire. They likely didn't know that destroying the TARDIS would have such a dangerous consequence (they certainly wouldn't have any reason to suspect that it would), and by resorting to such extreme measures, they ironically create the very situation that they're trying to prevent.

"Furthermore, how did they do it? The TARDIS is one of the most sophisticated ships in the universe that is virtually indestructible when it is fully functioning, so how were the silence able to hijack it and blow it up?"

- The Silents are characteristically stealthy. As soon as you look away, you can't remember them, so how would you know if one managed to sneak on board your ship and plant some sort of remote receiver? Never mind that the TARDIS isn't indestructible. Nine and Jack could only protect it from Dalek weaponry by wiring it up to Blon's macrokinetic extrapolator. And the engines ruptured in "Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS" just by crashing badly. The TARDIS is a rickety observation vessel, not an impenetrable space fortress.

"Why would a race of confessional priests essentially invade earth and enslave humanity, murdering people in the process, (TIA/DOM) when their quarrel was with the Doctor all along?"

- Because those priests were religious extremists who fought using history and temporal theory. They regarded themselves as the "sentinels of history," so obviously they have some reverance for the structure and stability of time, so they're not just going to invade Earth and demand a spacesuit when Earth's past is their own (the renegade Church faction that created those Silents consisted of humans, after all). Since they're crossing their own timestream, they have to be extra careful, so they have to take their time, which is actually a good thing because by nature of them working to prevent a threat in the far future, they have virtually no deadline. They can afford to be as meticulous as they need to be. So putting these two things together, it makes sense that they would slowly integrate themselves into Earth's history over a prolonged period of time in order to guide humanity's evolution to the point that they would develop a spacesuit for the Silence's use. And they don't make a fuss about killing people because they are clearly a group of "ends justify the means" types - essentially, "It doesn't matter if we kill them; the future we are working to prevent is far worse anyway."

"Some other details that I didn't like include Tasha Lem apparently being able to control herself despite being a dalek puppet which doesn't conform to their introduction in 'Asylum of the Daleks'."

- It didn't "not conform," it just added another layer. Besides, it was suggested in that episode that you could resist the initial transformation, so the concept is there for resisting the change after it's already been made. Tasha clearly has a strong will unlike, say, Harvey or whatshisname, so she would have a better chance at resisting it.

"Anatomically and strategically, it doesn't make sense why a Cyberman would be made of this flammable and brittle material."

- The reason for it being made of wood was explained - they had to get past the technolgoy ban somehow, and the enemies above Trenzalore were being forced to come up with newer and more abstract methods of doing that.

"Finally, I don't believe there was a need to make this episode Christmas themed. Doing so only made it gimmicky and unnessarily softened the dark potential of the story."

- Kind of comes with the package, there.




TheDreamer
TheDreamer

Just 1 year... wow, yeah time sure flies! It didnt hit me until you mentioned it but yup. ^^; And it's been 3 months since Christmas... Now if only time could hurry up and fly us straight to series 8, that'd be nice. Why does it only work one way??? :/

DW_girl
DW_girl

I am. People just nitpick and it frustrates me. I see no sexism issues with the show at all.

VortexDan
VortexDan

@DW_girl @VortexDan  Rapid fire, no breathing time, only emotional impact was a damn robot head. More "everybody lives" BS. Truth field is inconsistent as hell, and why doesn't the doctor leave instead of endangering all of these people. Why does he age now and not before (like in the gap between 6 and 7).  Clara continued to act as a plot device, with absolutely no agency. Rose actively tried to return to the TARDIS when sent back but Clara just sat and cried (also the Doctor gets NO repercussions for this, unlike every other doctor who acts so egotistical). Also they reuse the "companion fancies the doctor thing" that has been played out to hell and back and continues the fixation with making the doctor some kind of in universe sex symbol. And the forced kiss on Tasha and the bum pat (both without consent) are just continuing the problems earlier with Rory in 'Dinosaurs' and with Jenny in 'Crimson Horror'. And honestly I'm still very pissed about the horrid retcon from "Day of the Doctor" and this episode just doubled down on that stupidity.

Amy is Hannibal
Amy is Hannibal

@DW_girl @VortexDan  "Tasha was flirting with The Doctor so she kinda asked for it."

- Ooooooooo, I'm gonna call the rape culture police even though that's clearly not what you meant!!!!!!!!! :O



DW_girl
DW_girl

@Amy the Consulting Key Ring @lp229Good explanations yet again :) Another question though: How come the Silence needed the spacesuit when they engineered River to kill the Doctor anyway and the spacesuit could operate by itself? 

Or have I got the wrong end of the stick here....?

lp229
lp229

@Amy the Consulting Key Ring @lp229  These are all perfectly reasonable explanations, but most require the stretch of the imagination and have no basis with what was provided in the script for 'Time of the Doctor'.  I think that Moffat could have made more of an effort to round off these loose ends. There is a difference between leaving the audience to figure it out for themselves and lazy writing. 



DW_girl
DW_girl

I agree with some of your comments about the episode and plot solutions being rushed. However, I don't really think Clara was soley a plot device- she offered some genuine emotion and allowed the audience to relate to the story through her eyes. And I say it again, Clara was left behind through no fault of her own- her crying was a realistic reaction. And this sexism crap is NON EXISTENT PEOPLE!!!!

DW_girl
DW_girl

Seriously? The character of the Doctor can't even be associated with such cultures. But I'm glad you knew what I meant and that i wasn't coming across as some sexist pig. But this whole sexism thing against woman that the show is apparantly guilty of is just a load of crap. Does anyone really think that the writers are purposely putting some underlying message against females in a family show??? I'm just appalled....

Amy is Hannibal
Amy is Hannibal

@Polyphase @sontaran17  They didn't gather to kill him in "The Time of the Doctor". They all came in response to the message. And even in "The Pandorica Opens", they didn't come to kill him; rather, their goal was to imprison him. And even then, that's only one vague similarity shared by two episodes that are otherwise very different from each other, even in terms of narrative purpose - "The Pandorica Opens" being a tense cliffhanger and "The Time of the Doctor" being a resolution. Your assertion is wrong on practically all conceivable counts.



sontaran17
sontaran17

@Polyphase @sontaran17  TPO-- An Alliance is formed to stop contain the Doctor in the perfect prison, to prevent the cracks in the skin of the universe that threatened all of reality, as the origins of the cracks had been confirmed to be The TARDIS - and to the best of the Alliance's knowledge - Only the Doctor can fly the TARDIS!   


TOTD – A message is sent out among the stars, and draws to it hundreds of species from around the universe all to investigate – with no knowledge of the message’s translation or of the Doctor’s involvement – just that the lack of knowledge makes them afraid

Hardly similar circumstances at all, especially as neither of these scenarios constitute “All of his enemies gathering together to kill him









Amy is Hannibal
Amy is Hannibal

@DW_girl @lp229   And now you may be beginning to see why they don't explain all of this on-screen - it's quite cumbersome and time-consuming. :P



Amy is Hannibal
Amy is Hannibal

@DW_girl @Amy the Consulting Key Ring @lp229 Thank you, and the idea behind the spacesuit was to get River to kill the Doctor. However, River was infatuated with the Doctor at the time and almost certainly wouldn't have complied with a plot to kill him, so they needed some means of forcing her to do it. Hence their solution to stick her in a self-operating spacesuit, thereby giving her no choice in the matter - she will be the woman who kills the Doctor whether she likes it or not. The Silence knew that on that date, an "impossible astronaut" would rise up from the deep and "strike the Time Lord dead," and they knew that River was in prison for killing "a good man." So what they did was fill in the gap in order to create a circular paradox by engineering history to make River the person in the suit.

But why River? Well, who better to make the Doctor's murderer than someone from his future? "The Angels Take Manhattan" showed us exactly why foreknowledge is dangerous - once you know your future, it's fixed. So someone from the future whose life and whose parents' lives are deeply intertwined with the Doctor's own timeline is the perfect instrument for killing him and making his death a fixed point, because if he or anybody else tries to change it, time will unravel due to the resultant paradoxes (as shown in "The Wedding of River Song"). Better yet if you can control the circumstances of her birth and practically create her to begin with, thereby entangling the timelines even further.

Plus, she makes a convenient patsy. As long as River takes the fall for the murder, the Silence isn't likely to be questioned as long as they keep quiet about it. The Tessy crew only launched a covert investigation of the order after the events that occurred in Berlin which no doubt struck them as odd.