News Categories
Archives

The End of Time: Why it Needs More Love

Guest contributor Andrew Gledhill-Carr on Tennant’s divisive swan song.

eotdec-(14)

I’ll start with the elephant in the room to get it out of the way. “I don’t want to go.” I really like this line and find it befitting for a character who suffers traumatic changes in personality, but I think it is important to understand that the Tenth Doctor lived a very short life. Six years, if his word is anything to go by, at the maximum. Now keep in mind that the Doctor’s personality changes as he regenerates, and once out of nine other times, this personality is just a tad narcissistic and only had six tiny earth years to live. Of course the Tenth Doctor didn’t want to go! It doesn’t matter that he never felt like that in the past, we’ve seen how drastic the Doctor can change with regeneration and on this occasion, he gained a persona that was not very keen on changing again.

I used to dislike the Master during The End of Time. I wasn’t very impressed with his insanity, and it still rings alarm bells when I watch it now, but I think Simm did an excellent job with what he was given, and made a very compelling performance for the episodes. While he might have lost his bloodchilling threat from The Sound of Drums, he became a rather complex character. I think perhaps his insanity is understandable given the circumstances of his resurrection, which was aborted mid-completion. But I think people miss the fact the Master regains his former stature as the story goes on, and by the end, he is back to the nefarious time lord we all know and love.

eotdec-(37)What I really enjoyed about the Master during The End of Time was how unpredictable he became. Unlike many other adversaries in the show, the Master is not someone you can call a monster, and you can see that in his emotional moments with the Doctor. You can see that he really considers the Doctor’s offers of help, moments made even more poignant after having experienced the Master in classic episodes, because you consider everything they’ve done and been through. The classics in this sense are almost like their childhood, petty plans of domination and witty banter compared to where they are now.

But the star of The End of Time, for me is Wilfred Mott. How Bernard Cribbins did not win countless awards for his portrayal as Donna’s adorably realistic Grandfather I do not know. Every moment between Wilf and the Doctor is as well acted, well written and tear-jerkingly touching as the last. Russell tried something very new here, doing away with the pretty sidekick and putting in their place a person that contrasts and complements the Doctor befitting for Ten’s swansong. There will never be anything like the interaction between these two on the show again, because the circumstance and actors made it a very unique event. The café and the gun scene come to mind, and I think when people talk about The End of Time, these are the most prominent that come to identify the episode. They are also the scenes that I feel demonstrate why this is the best, and yes, I just said that, the best, regeneration story the history of Who has ever seen.

eotdec-(20)With the café moment, the Time Lord is stripped away and you are left with a man afraid of dying. Some people, including Moffat I dare say, might disagree with this aspect, but it humanizes the Doctor and makes him very relatable. Yes he’s a Time Lord from Gallifrey who’s at least nine hundred and six years old, but he’s still a person. A living creature with an intelligent consciousness, with – and this is the key word – emotion! Other regeneration stories get so caught up with the action and the events, and when the time comes it’s as simple as handing over the keys to the TARDIS and all is well again, but this story is different, because it steps back, slows down and examines the scenario of a character knowing about their “death”, this time around, and how they deal with that.

Then you have the gun scene, where Wilf insists the Doctor takes his weapon to save his own life, and this for me is one of, if not the most powerful Tenth Doctor moments, because even in the face of death, even when the human race has been eradicated, the Doctor will not take the life of the Master. I think this moment manages to encourage admiration and disgust in him. “And that’s how the Master started,” – such an unarguable line that brings a very swift silence. In a way, he is being nobly selfish, and I think people should look here when they claim Ten is being ‘whiney’ in regards to his regeneration. This is proof that it is not the case. He is not having vanity issues at all, because here he would rather die than kill someone to save himself. But it is the moment after this scene that makes a powerful exchange between two characters a hundred-fold more powerful. Because as the Master tells the Doctor of the white point star (And thus the return of the Time Lords) he snatches that gun up without question. Immediately you know there is some big trouble ahead.

rassilon-doctor-who-end-of-timeI think Timothy Dalton deserves a quick mention for his portrayal of Rassilon in this story as well. He was born to play it. Rassilon IS Timothy Dalton. His commanding, looming presence, conveying such might and threat with just a look is beyond words to describe and he really sold the story here. I think without him, The End of Time wouldn’t be nearly as cinematic as it is (and it does run for a hundred and thirty five minutes, that’s movie length!)

This brings me to my next point. If none of these other reasons are enough to persuade you why The End of Time deserves to be loved then let me say two words. The soundtrack. The score for this story is godly. Every track feels right in its place, but more importantly, crafted with every ounce of love the people involved could muster. Whether it’s “The End Draws Near” during the café scene, leading you up to the cinematic pan of the earth and the hair-raising moment of Dalton’s reveal, or the variant of “All the Strange Strange Creatures” making what could otherwise be a silly moment when the Master becomes everyone on earth, a very compelling cliffhanger, or perhaps even the rendition of “This is Gallifrey” that’s become bitter, tired and war-like as the war-torn home planet of our hero is revealed, and then there is “Vale”, used sparingly in The Waters of Mars and masterfully as the Tenth Doctor says his final goodbye to the friends he’d known over his life. I could go on, but The End of Time is a musical masterpiece. The epitome of Murray’s work on the show.

Music is so integral to Doctor Who now, and after watching lots of the classic episodes I can see that more than ever (it is a key thing that is missing!) it doesn’t just enhance an emotion. It makes the emotion, and in an emotional episode Murray couldn’t get things more right.

the_end_of_time sarah jane goodbyeThe final thing, that is rather hated among the Who community, that I feel makes this such a strong episode are the farewells waved by Ten to his friends. As mentioned above, “Vale” makes these moments incredibly strong, but the actual concept itself makes this episode, not just another story where the Doctor changes his face, but a goodbye. A goodbye to an era of marvellous stories and characters. Yes it does go on for a lengthy period of time, but not one moment feels out of place or wasted. I struggle to single out the best part, but I think it has to go to Sarah Jane’s scene. Elizabeth Sladen’s untimely death has made this moment ten times stronger. I don’t think I need to explain why.

To finish, I’d like to mention something else that makes this story very interesting. The Day of the Doctor. I find it fascinating, and consoling to know that despite the events in this story, somewhere, somewhen, thirteen Time Lords are busy rescuing their homeworld. Perhaps we’ll see the mysterious woman who is alleged to be the Doctor’s mother again. Maybe Mr Dalton will return as the ever so terrifying Rassilon, and perhaps, just perhaps a certain John Simm is ready to regenerate (into Charles Dance I beg of you BBC!) and start a new plot of universal domination for Capaldi to thwart.

The End of Time is the definitive regeneration story of movie length and design that neatly bookmarks an era of the Doctor’s life like no other. It might not be perfectly flawless like Silence in the Library and Forest of the Dead, but I find it darned near hard to fault!

Step back in time...

COMMENT GUIDELINES

Please be civil and keep article comments relevant and on topic. Flag and report any offensive/trolling behavior, or contact us with details.
Please do not post SPOILERS including anything from leaked episodes! Your account could be banned. For complete details on our comment policy please read.
358 comments
Ace Pirosu
Ace Pirosu

A few things I'd like to add:                                                                                                                                    1. The gun scene was even stronger when you consider Wilfred's part, knowing that the gun is the only thing that can save The Doctor and also knowing The Doctor will never accept it, for the same reason that he/we love him so much: he never uses violence. It feels so much like Wilf is fighting a losing battle here, and it's so powerful.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        2. The mysterious woman can't be The Doctor's mother, because the Eighth Doctor said his mother was human, and this woman is a Time Lord. Even if a human was allowed to permanently stay on Gallifrey, she wouldn't be in a high enough position to be able to vote in the High Council of Time Lords (and she did, as she was revealed as one of the two people who had voted against the Final Sanction). Also, I doubt the writers would make it so on obvious, although River Song being revealed as The Doctor's wife (despite the fact THAT was really cheap and obvious) could disprove that theory.                                                                                                                                                                                         3. The words "I think sometimes  a Time Lord lives too long" proves that Ten has resigned himself to his fate even though he later realises he never really wanted to go. The fact that he saved Wilf even after his rage (loved dat acting by the way) also suggests this.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 4. I also loved the soundtrack, with my favourites being Vale Decem, This is Gallifrey, Rassilon's Requiem and the one that played when The Master activated the Immortality Gate (don't know the name of that one :P)























DW_girl
DW_girl

Great article! I've aways loved The End of Time and I thought it was an excellently emotional way for the Tenth Doctor to go. You mentioned about Ten only being in his incarnation for a relatively short amount of time, and it got me wondering; does anyone know how long each of the Doctor's incarnations lasted for? Is there a link or anything where I can investigate?

ahunter8056
ahunter8056

Yes, I think that 'The End Of Time' is vastly underrated by most fans, and I just don't understand the hate for it. I'll admit, it's not one of my favourite episodes, and it does seem a bit slow and boring in places, but no episode is perfect. What I don't understand the most is the hate for the last 10 minutes. I think the farewell tour is a marvellous idea, in fact one that I think every Doctor should have. I don't understand why anyone would be against seeing past faces one last time. And the line of "I don't want to go" is entirely appropriate and understandable. Ten had good looks and a good personality. So why would he want to go? For all he knew, he could regenerate and become evil. I don't consider that line "whiny" at all. I think it's an entirely valid line and fits the situation. I really don't understand why people consider Ten to be "whiny" in this episode. Towards the end he gets angry and knocks paper off a desk, but would you be happy if you found out that you would be forced to either let a friend die or change completely, possibly for worse? His anger is entirely justified and again, fits the situation.



DeanAlexander
DeanAlexander

It's interesting. looking back now. How unlikable the 10th Doctor really was.

firstdavros1975
firstdavros1975

I agree. This story, The End of Time is one of my entire favourites from New Who. And it still feels like I just watched it yesterday :'(

ClaireAbraham
ClaireAbraham

The thing that always confused me the most about Ten's fear of death in the End of Time is that it was out of character.  Not just for The Doctor, in general, but for Ten, very specifically.  He offered his life to save others several times before without batting an eye. He offered his life to save that of the Hooverville residents, begging the Daleks to take him instead. He did it again in Poison Sky, going into an almost certainly deadly situation just because he felt like he was morally obligated to give the Sontarans a choice. He was so hell-bent on giving his own life to save River Song in The Forest of the Dead, she had to handcuff him to a railing to keep him from ruining their life together. 


The Tenth Doctor was NOT afraid of death until after Journey's End. That's why I agree with Ilyootha; it would have made a lot more sense if he was under the impression that he would not regenerate, that this was it for him. Remember that he was not at all freaked out at meeting Jackson Lake; he was perfectly OK with meeting another potential future self, and he was equally content to meet Eleven.  The overall impression I get is that Ten's story makes the most sense if he was afraid of not regenerating; whenever he gets evidence that he's going to regenerate and like the man he's going to become, he's OK with the situation. Indeed, that's my headcanon - not so much because I dislike watching my favorite manifestation of the Doctor whine and carry on like a spoiled baby, but because it didn't make any sense in terms of how he'd behaved before, even with David Tennant's face. 

The problem seems to be that Davies inserted his own sadness in leaving the show into Ten's demeanor in a way that did not exist before. That could be acceptable, but the difference in attitude has to be explained somehow. 

If we believe that he thinks he's actually dying for good, a lot of the show makes more sense, including the quote that "Sometimes I think a Time Lord lives too long." He wasn't actually going to cease to exist, but that comment is the comment of somebody who believes his life is over. The tour of old friends - meant, of course as a curtain call to everybody who worked on New Who up to that point - also makes more sense if he's saying goodbye to everybody he ever loved.  That's what a dying man might do, but not really the actions of a man who is about to have his appearance change. It does, however, also work well as a capstone on the story of a guy who finally gave up on having companions; after pushing them all away, he embraces them again before he changes again. 

I think this episode had one flaw that could be pretty easily fixed with a line or two of dialogue about why he thinks he won't regenerate. 

Clara Laurinda
Clara Laurinda

Thank you for this eloquent and detailed article. It really is an exceptionally fine episode that I think too many people have allowed their frustration over some elements to cloud its brilliance. 

nyma
nyma

About the goodbyes, one thing bugs me. He went backwards and forwards in time and space. Couldn't go say goodbye to Joan, instead went to the book release of her grandaughter? Couldn't be there for Martha and Mickey's marriage?  Other thing: he does whine, when he does not want to sacrifice himself for Wilfred. It kind of ruined it. Yes, he was too young in this regeneration, a bit narcissistic, and all that. Yeah, after the choice he (thinks) he made in the time war, letting a single person die when he can help it is not something he wants. But either do it or don't, don't go complaining because you don't want to do it when you are chosing to do it all by yourself. But the episode was really good, intense, emotional... We really feel his pain, and when he says "I don't wanna go" we also share that feeling. It's very, very good.



Temporal_Tomato
Temporal_Tomato

For some reason I have always thought that Brian Blessed would be a perfect Rassilon. I can't even explain myself on that one...

WhoPotterVian
WhoPotterVian

Totally agree. The End Of Time is the best regeneration story so far. It's beautiful and a perfect fair-well  to David Tennant(by far the best Doctor. He is incomparable to the others).

gunslinger19
gunslinger19

i dont think that 10 was really only around for six years. he might have worked it out in terms of the time period that he was in. for example, im pretty sure that most times that he says his age he is near or on contemporary earth, day of the doctor being the exception. and if you count infinite quest as canon, doesnt he spend 3 years on a bird or something? 

MaraBackman
MaraBackman

One of the things I find most interesting about the Master in this story is that his situation mirrors what happened to him before, way back in The Deadly Assassin. He was a rotting zombie after his final regeneration and in TeoT his resurrection was incomplete and caused him to burn out. He also looks similar to the zombie-Master whenever the flashing skull is seen and he is wearing a much cheaper hood this time around, but thematically the Master has returned to his previous low point and returned as a vampire of sorts. 

The elixirs used to resurrect him made sense considering what we knew from before of Time Lord technology and the Sisterhood of Karn, even though it would have been nice to have had better foreshadowing for it. Still, Moffat did this story a retro-active favour in Night of the Doctor by showing the Sisterhood doing for the Doctor more or less the same thing the Master's cultists tried to do for him. 

That revelation and the Master's current state of being does offer a hint of what the Master's pretty much inevitable return might feature: He is working on properly completing his resurrection through some means of Time Lord alchemy, while periodically feeding on the life-force of lesser creatures to postpone his death, which would give him a reputation of a vampire. Bonus points if the story borrows elements from Bram Stoker's Dracula and other Gothic horror stories.

Strontium
Strontium

I have never understood the hate against this episode. It, for me, is up there in my favourites ever. I know so many people (in person) who watched this, and there is not a single one who dislikes this episode. You hit every point there perfectly, and I could not agree more.

are_you_my_doctor
are_you_my_doctor

I've always liked the two episodes. Tennant's acting is fantastic! Yes there are bits that are not great but overall I love it!!

whoaddictreviews
whoaddictreviews

I couldn't agree more with what you're saying! We're forgetting that each Doctor is completely different and Ten simply looked at regeneration in a different way to his past selves and even future self , changing everything you are! In his point of view, he wasn't ready to go because he's had bodies that have lasted FAR, FAR longer! Some have lived centuries and he has simply been around for a measly 5 earth years (if you include the year that never happened in Series 3). He probably felt cheated out of years that he never had!

And referencing to what Eleven said in his final episode "I had vanity issues at the time". So the Doctor even knew then that his past self was vein and loved himself a bit too much.

So, really! The End of Time was perfectly in character for THAT Doctor in particular and as this guy said it made him relatable and closer to reality. Why this story was SO low in the recent issue of DWM (Doctor Who Magazine) is an insult to Russell T. Davies' final story and David's Doctor!! 

MatthewBurrows
MatthewBurrows

The problem with Russell is he cannot construct plots...and then there is endless crass campness. He is great at Dialogue. You get a good actor like John Simm, and get to play a Master that is no way like a master.



AnEarthlyChild
AnEarthlyChild

I like it, it's a good episode but the Master was kinda - with lack of a better word - suck in this episode. The whole thing where he made the "Master race" and how he had those powers... Bleurgh. Also the Doctor's whining got a little annoying but I love the conclusion the drum beat thing. That was cool! :)

SirTrey
SirTrey

@Ace Pirosu Regarding point 2, Davies himself has said that she was written as the Doctor's mother and the actress was told that's who she would be playing,  He's acknowledged it could be left open to interpretation since it's never clearly stated, but that was 100% the intention by the original writing and acting. So I think he just largely ignored that statement from 8. - http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/The_Woman_(The_End_of_Time)  


alwaysrunning
alwaysrunning

@ahunter8056 It's not justified when he's going to come right back. All the others knew this and accepted it. Except for Two but he had a good excuse because he was being forced to change. Suddenly having him spend the whole episode complaining that he's about to regenerate is ridiculous.


I'll accept it's totally a personality thing and you probably really have to be able to deal with Ten's whole personalty for all of his time as the Doctor to really like and accept this episode. I never really did and while there were several episodes I liked him in and could deal with there were a lot of others where  I didn't. Hell I ended up liking Six better than him!

MaraBackman
MaraBackman

@DeanAlexander Admittedly he is a Marmite-Doctor, in that reactions to his characteristics will be very strong one way or the other. Personally, I liked him a lot and found him to be immensely likeable in spite of his many flaws. These flaws made him more human and more relatable for the most part. The Tenth Doctor is essentially a masterfully written Byronic hero, because most of it was intentional from the writers' part.

A Friend of the Ood
A Friend of the Ood

@ClaireAbraham "The Tenth Doctor was NOT afraid of death until after Journey's End"

What if his partial regeneration in Journey's End changed him? I've always thought regeneration was a gradual process, not an instant switch (which is probably why I was disappointed with Time of the Doctor), so even an aborted regeneration could still affect him. If he regenerated enough to heal himself, why couldn't that affect his personality too? 

Post-Journey's End Ten seems more depressed, darker, and has more moments of insanity, "Time Lord Victorious", etc. I don't know if it was intentional, but it almost seemed like a partially new incarnation.

TeagueTysseling
TeagueTysseling

@ClaireAbraham I've seen it more as Ten not wanting to give up this version of him, because he doesn't know what he'll become.    He's horrified by what he was capable of and how far he went in Waters of Mars.   He still remembers that he might become the Valeyard.     What if his new personality is worse, and with no companion there to hold him back or have to put on a brave face for, and no Time Lords to keep track of the universe anymore.  What's to stop him from becoming a full blown terror?










MaraBackman
MaraBackman

@ClaireAbraham As I've said earlier I found it to be quite in character for this particular Doctor. He wanted so desperately to be human and subsequently started to fear death/regeneration in a more human-like way, which makes sense if he sees his past and future selves as other people. He wouldn't be the first Doctor to do so, considering how many of the Doctors have felt about their immediate predecessor or successor.

allons_ywibblywobbly
allons_ywibblywobbly

@ClaireAbraham In my opinion, there is definitely a fear of not regenerating at all. Ten really thought he will die for good when he heard the prophecy. Even Eleven is surprised when he is born, like he didn't expect it. Of course, it's also implied that even if he regenerates, for the Doctor (at least, this Doctor) feels like a death. But when he says "Lived too long" before saving Wilfred it can mean both things. Either THIS incarnation lived too long (because he realised the Time Lord Victorius is showing again and he needed to be stopped) or he feels like his entire life as a Time Lord is over (it's plausible enough, since in this episode he just "killed" Gallifrey again) and he feels like he doesn't deserve living after this. 

I think Russell managed to do something very powerful here, gave the regeneration a much deeper meaning and made the Doctor feel more vulnerable than ever before. There are so many subtle meanings to each line in this episode, no wonder it's one of my favourite episodes!




oldstargazer56
oldstargazer56

@Clara Laurinda 

The 10th Doctor was my favorite, but then I got the know the 11th and loved him too. Why can't Moffat do specials that show the 10th and 11th.?  With the time thing, they are still going strong somewhere.  People would flock to see those movies and it would not totally disrupt the other aspirations of the actors.

Temporal_Tomato
Temporal_Tomato

According to TARDIS Wikia, he also spent a number of years looking for a girl he met in an aborted time line in a Comic. Age in Doctor Who can be tricky...

ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe
ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe

@gunslinger19Ten was 903 in Voyage of the Damned - which, if I'm not mistaken, is the first time his age was mentioned since Series 1. The Infinite Quest takes place during Series 3, so there is enough space to fit three years in.




MaraBackman
MaraBackman

@gunslinger19 My guess would be that he doesn't mention all the passing years out of some sort of vanity, but also because he honestly can't keep track. Eleven more freely admits to two centuries passing during Series 6, but later he lessens his age to "a thousand". Together with the many different ages the Doctor has given himself since the 1960's, I guess that he simply loses track and becomes more confused than he'd want to admit by traveling back and forth through time, so he just makes up a number that sounds right at the moment.

MaraBackman
MaraBackman

On a related note: There is a ton of thematic and visual references to the Classic show throughout the revived show, so I'm thinking of making two lists of these things, one for each showrunner.

ClaireAbraham
ClaireAbraham

@whoaddictreviews I'd buy into this idea more if he'd never offered to give up his own life to save somebody else.  Ten had done that at least three times before without so much as a whimper.

Ace Pirosu
Ace Pirosu

@A Friend of the Ood @ClaireAbraham I liked Matt's regeneration though... Bear in mind that most of it was spent on blowing up a dalek fleet and Eleven's last words pretty much summed up what he would have felt during the process.


Temporal_Tomato
Temporal_Tomato

I couldn't care less, maybe Rassilon observed the events of Mindwarp and was inspired? XD 
I want to see the Five Doctors remade with Brian Blessed as Rassilon. I can see it now... "WHO WANTS TO LIFE FOR EVER?" *Cackles manically.* 

ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe
ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe

@Temporal_TomatoI don't trust the wiki in terms of the Doctor's age. It is said there that the Fourth Doctor gives his age as 757 in The Brain of Morbius before giving it as 749 in The Seeds of Doom, suggesting that he lies at one point. However, in reality, in both stories he gives his age as 749, so it's the wiki who lies, not the Doctor.

Furthermore, the wiki states that in the novel Cold Fusion, the Fifth Doctor gives his age as 813. I haven't read the book myself, but none of the sites such as the discontinuity guide confirm this, and I've searched the pdf file for all possible mentions of age and words related to numbers, there is no mention of this either...




Ace Pirosu
Ace Pirosu

@ClaireAbraham @MaraBackman When he tried to sacrifice himself those times, it was on a whim; his primal thought was "must save <insert name here> as quickly as possible!" In this case however, he's been expecting (actual) death for a long time and the gap in between The Waters of Mars and The End of Time was spent steeling himself for this fate. In the episode itself, he was willing to throw everything away so he could save everything else as per usual. In the scene where Wilf tries to give him the gun, he even looks at himself as someone who's lived too long, surviving by "manipulating people into taking their own lives". So when he's saved by The Master and believes the prophecy's been broken, he was overwhelmed with joy, only for his hopes being crushed by Wilf's knocking. It's therefore only natural that he would be feeling cheated; to die simply because an old man got stuck when he'd just survived and prevented the end of time. That's why I thought it was extremely fitting for Ten to go down raging against his own luck/fate, while deep down knowing it was all inevitable, not to mention Tennant portrayed that perfectly. When you consider the fact that Davies wanted to make the audience feel like the Doctor's regeneration was equivalent to death this time around (just for a take on something new that worked brilliantly in my opinion) and that Ten had only lived for six years, "I don't want to go" is the perfect response. In short, I think the episode had a terrific play on a dying man's emotions as well as a climactic end to one of my favourite Doctors.




MaraBackman
MaraBackman

@ClaireAbraham @MaraBackman Ultimately I'd say that it is because the Tenth Doctor had lots of emotional issues and his fear of death grew over time, due to of his many bad experiences. In The Daleks Take Manhattan he was most likely still having a death-wish for recently having lost Rose, who had helped him get a bit less obviously battle-scarred than Eccleston was. This is something that was seen in The Runaway Bride, where he had little desire to survive his encounter with the Racnoss. But Martha's influence made him less suicidal and gave him a renewed sense of purpose. But he had people he cared for and whom he wanted to protect, people whom he would die for if needed. That is why he was often seemingly willing to sacrifice himself for others, but partly also because it fit his more or less heroic image and he didn't want to let down the ones he cared for. I also imagine that all those times he suggested he'd sacrifice himself he was still thinking of possible ways to get out of the situation unharmed, except during The Runaway Bride. But by the time he lost Donna's influence over him he went into a serious depression and grew tired of his life, but when his time was up it looked like his death/regeneration was actually going to happen fairly soon, then he got scared and felt that was still not ready to go. It is not unheard of for people who say they've grown tired of life to still try to survive by any means necessary if they are threatened. Anyhow, this is how I interpreted the Tenth Doctor's arc.

ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe
ilyootha is in the Divergent Universe

@gunslinger19Well, it means that the events of Series 4 and the first three specials made the Doctor only one year older. It's a bit of a stretch, but unless I forgot something, or there is another book or comic or something where he spends several months, it's plausible. Especially if you imagine that he only became 903 a few days before Voyage, and 905 soon after Day, it would make it almost 2 years.

Also, in my headcanon one Gallifreyan year is approximately 1.5 Earth years (he ran from Gallifrey at 236, in a book it's said that he spent 60 years traveling prior An Unearthly Child, and he was always with human companions until The Tomb of the Cybermen four seasons later, where he said he is approximately 450 in human terms. (236+60+4)/450=1.5), which stretches the gap up to almost 3 years!




MaraBackman
MaraBackman

@stargazer0118 @MaraBackman It's on my rather long to-do-list, together with the following ideas:


The Tenth Doctor as a Byronic Hero (which might lead to examinations of what archetypes the other Doctors fit)

The Inhuman Transhumans of Doctor Who

A description of the circumstances where a female Doctor could work to my liking