News Categories
Archives

Into the Dalek Review

Clint Hassell gives his verdict on the second episode of Series 8.

into-the-dalek-ship

Plot-wise, “Into the Dalek” offers nothing new, blatantly copying the basic premise of Fantastic Voyage, a meta reference that it’s a “fantastic idea for a movie” serving as its plea for forgiveness. However, by placing the episode directly following “Deep Breath” – the Doctor having now “fetched” the aforementioned coffee – Phil Ford and Steven Moffat also use their script to further examine the Twelfth Doctor’s character, making the episode richer than the flimsy premise merits.

When the Doctor asks Clara for an answer that is “honest, cold, and considered, without kindness or constraint” – words that could never have described the Eleventh Doctor (or the Tenth, or even the Ninth) – Ford and Moffat are actually defining this incarnation’s personality. These are his values, now, and they’re evidenced by the Doctor’s quips crossing from “careless” to “caustic.”

journey-gun-into-the-dalekHowever, despite his new demeanor, “Into the Dalek” demonstrates that the Doctor’s defining character traits remain the same, including his inherent desire to make people better. “No, no, come on. Not like that . . . . Get it right,” he demands of Journey, even though she has a gun pointed at him, and is in shock over the loss of her brother. “Will you take me back to my ship . . . please?” she responds. This isn’t just a lesson in manners, but in conflict resolution, negotiation, and tempering violence. This is how the Doctor initially tries to solve problems, not with screwdriver-induced explosions, but with insight, and with words. Note that, upon rescuing Journey, his first priority is not to destroy the attacking Dalek saucer, but to ensure Journey’s safe return to the Aristotle. Further, in the episode’s third act, the Doctor appeals to Journey’s humanity, reminding her that, “Soldiers take orders,” and encouraging her to think for herself:

The Doctor: “A Dalek is a better soldier than you will ever be. You can’t win this way.”
Journey: “So, what do we do?”
The Doctor: “Something better.”

into-the-dalek-reject-journeyThat so much of “Into the Dalek” demonstrates the positive effect the presence of the Doctor has on others, the conclusion to Journey’s story even is more heartbreaking. What a terrifically wasted opportunity! Journey has the best introduction and reason to join the TARDIS crew than anyone since Martha, and could have been the best example of a companion fulfilling the Doctor’s mantra of becoming extraordinary since Rose or Donna. Plus, her name is “Journey” – how is that not perfect for a companion? It’s as on-the-nose as, say, the War Doctor having an assistant named “Ash.” “Nice,” “kind,” “brave” – and obviously capable – the Doctor has taken on far worse companions than Journey, before. Leaving Journey to regret her station in life was a terrible action, and against the Doctor’s message of doing the right thing.

Why does the Twelfth Doctor have such contempt for soldiers? It would be an understandable prejudice from, say, Nine, or Ten, who would remember the War Doctor as the soldier who destroyed Gallifrey, but, after the events of “The Day of the Doctor,” the disdain makes little sense. Further, the aversion is contradictory to continuity as six out of nine modern-day companions – Rose, Jack, Mickey, Martha, Amy, and Rory (and also Wilf, Strax, and probably Vastra, not to mention Kate Stewart, and the oft-mentioned-as-of-late Brigadier) – have had ties to the military, or have been classified as soldiers.

into the dalek pic batch a (6)Beyond further examining the Doctor, “Into the Dalek” is notable for, well, not redefining the Daleks. While the frequent recurrence of the Doctor’s most-recognizable foes has yielded diminishing returns – and, yes, this episode was a shameless tactic to get an audience, unsure of Capaldi as the Doctor, to return for his second episode – it is not because the Daleks appear to be too easily defeated, but because many of their episodes are terrible. “Daleks in Manhattan”/”Evolution of the Daleks,” “Victory of the Daleks,” and “Asylum of the Daleks” all focused on reimagining the Daleks over embracing their nature as irrationally hate-filled, seemingly-unstoppable war machines, resulting in sub-par episodes. The Daleks haven’t been truly terrifying since Series 4’s “The Stolen Earth”/“Journey’s End” and “The Waters of Mars.” While “Into the Dalek” is an unconventional Dalek episode, in that the titular Dalek is more the setting and less the threat, its script includes lines like, “We don’t need hospitals, now. The Daleks don’t leave any wounded,” and images of a Dalek platoon invading the Aristotle to remind the audience that the Daleks are truly terrifying when they aren’t serving tea.

Unfortunately, unlike the Daleks, Clara’s character is written as inconsistent. For every uncharacteristically-harsh “Where the hell have you been?” there is a moment where she answers the Doctor’s “Am I a good man?” question with chosen sincerity – a mark of true friendship, which has been largely missing from the Doctor/companion dynamic since Clara’s arrival. “Hand on my heart, most days he’s both,” is a fantastic circular reference, as Clara is asked to be decidedly honest about the Doctor’s nature, at two points in the same episode.

clara-slap-into-the-dalekHowever, Clara’s slapping the Doctor is especially jarring. Of course, she would be angry, having been placed in mortal danger, seemingly on the Doctor’s erratic whim. Her comment, “We’re going to die in here, and there’s a tiny piece of you that’s pleased. The Daleks are evil after all, everything makes sense, the Doctor is right!” is wildly accurate in its description of the Doctor’s motives. However, one defining characteristic of Clara’s (and there aren’t many) is that she is resourceful with her words; such a physical reaction seems out of place.

Most frustratingly, the script for “Into the Dalek” doesn’t capitalize on Clara’s unique aspects to further the story, relegating her to her usual, stock-companion role:

The Doctor: “You need to get up there, find that moment, and reawaken it.”
Clara: “Me? . . . How?”
The Doctor: “Haven’t the foggiest. Do a clever thing. And when you’ve done it, the Dalek will be suggestible to new ideas. It will be open again. And I will show it something that will change its mind forever!”

The episode doesn’t even bother to make this plot point sensible; as resourceful as she is, how could a miniaturized Clara be able to rewire the alien Dalek circuitry? This is a shame, because the narrative has already given us a perfectly good reason to expect Clara’s success: she had her mind filled with computer knowledge in “The Bells of Saint John.” Mentioning this would not only have been a nice reference of continuity, but it actually would have furthered Journey and Gretchen’s storylines, as it would provide a reason for Gretchen’s sacrifice and for Journey’s request to travel with the Doctor. (“Wait – you’ve had your mind rewired and you still trust and follow him?” “Yes, he’s that amazing!”) Instead, the episode includes this line, “Of course! It’s a brain! Brains work with electrical pathways linking up memories. It’s working! We’re turning the memories back on!” The dialogue is embarrassing, and it is evident that even actress Jenna Coleman doesn’t believe what she is saying.

clara-and-danny-into-the-dalekIt is especially fitting that Clara chides the Doctor for not considering the possibility of a “good Dalek.” Oswin, the “good Dalek” from “Asylum of the Daleks” was later revealed to be a time-splintered aspect of Clara, a plot point the script fails to mention. Unfortunately, by neglecting this point, Clara’s final encounter with Danny Pink lacks a deeper layer of uncertainty. Having just seen the Doctor reject someone because they were a soldier, Clara is surprised to see that, maybe, she has those preconceptions, too. Could she also be pondering that, if she’s like the Doctor, and he’s like a Dalek, then she draws uncomfortably close to Oswin’s character? Exactly how different are Clara’s time-splintered selves?

Just as with Clara’s role, the introduction of Danny Pink is both brimming with clever possibility and flawed in its execution. The scene where Danny tears up, ostensibly having remembered killing a non-soldier, in the past, isn’t believable. Not only does he seem so emotionally raw as to not be able to survive the job interview necessary to teach children, but many details of the scene aren’t quite thought through. Danny’s such a new teacher at Coal Hill that Clara’s never met him, yet he’s already sponsoring an extracurricular activity (during which Clara all-too-coincidentally arrives). He’s been asked if he’s killed someone so often that the class groans from the repetition, yet he’s only now falling apart. Possibly, it’s the start of a new school year, but why then is Cathy only now leaving? Yes, technically, Fleming’s question was differently phrased, but, surely, the flashback that it triggered would arise either way. And, perhaps, an ex-soldier of his emotional fragility shouldn’t be in charge of the Coal Hill Cadets?

Those quibbles are forgivable, though, because of what Ford and Moffat accomplish next. As Danny and Clara meet, the scene jumps back and forth in time, telling the story out of order, giving better insight into Danny’s mind. While it is not unusual for a plotline to flash backwards in time to reveal preceding causal events (as, in fact, occurs in this episode), it is unusual to more than foreshadow future events. (Is Danny’s defensive denial that he is a “ladykiller” really a hint at his past?) For a show about time travel to experiment with linearity in such a figurative, symbolic manner adds an amazing, metaphorical layer to the narrative.

Step back in time...

COMMENT GUIDELINES

Please be civil and keep article comments relevant and on topic. Flag and report any offensive/trolling behavior, or contact us with details.
Please do not post SPOILERS including anything from leaked episodes! Your account could be banned. For complete details on our comment policy please read.
205 comments
Sugar in Olympia
Sugar in Olympia

I was truly impressed with the visualization of entering the Dalek body. That was what quality sci-fi should be. Clara' s snapping at him, and even striking him, just follows with her redefined relationship with a new partner who actually claims to be her old partner thus testing her patience. Though cute and nice, she wouldn't have given Danny the attention she did if the 11th Doctor was still her travelling companion. She hit it right by referring to herself as his 'cares' as all of his companions are basically his ground and often his conscience. Finally, yes I agree that an interesting opportunity was missed with denying Journey the chance to travel with him, but maybe this is a set up for future reflection about how he has changed in many more ways than just physically.


Young No More
Young No More

Nice insights on most ends, although I'm inclined to differ for the Clara parts. 


I think Clara's various responses are developing her character further, having lifted her bubbly personality masking bossy control freak. The first retort, the slap are aspects of her egomania, especially now that she's used to being in full control as a teacher. 


And then there's the Doctor sending her up to do a clever thing. Even though he says he haven't got a foggiest to reawaken the memories, he must be absolutely confident that Clara would find the clever thing to do, before sending her up. Cause he's the Doctor. 

And then there's the lack of reference to Oswin the Dalek. There's one tiny reference to AOTD "how do you know who I am" when the Doctor first meets his patient, showing the writers had got it under consideration. Then when Rusty first utters the phrase "I see beauty", there's a lingering focus on Clara herself on Rusty's screen. And at the end of the episode, Rusty was loitering at the hallway looking at Clara too even after Doctor's gone, and all the soldier having turned their attention away from Rusty. I see Rusty's behaviour as a clue, that perhaps it might actually be Oswin herself, having survived the Asylum's destruction. 


Fall of the Eleventh
Fall of the Eleventh

One of the reasons 12 is so soldier averse, in my opinion, is that he spent 300 years under seige and then another 5–600 years actively at war defending Trenzalore with soldiers from soldiers. 900 odd years of being in a state of war readiness would make anyone abhor the thought of another skirmish and that could be expressed through his caustic behavior toward those who would have to fight it.

StarTrace
StarTrace

Journey is such a great character, I very much doubt we've seen the last of her, especially given 'Journey Blue' and 'Danny Pink'- there's got to be some link between them, much like the Ponds and River. And okay, here's an 'out-there' thought-what if the Doctor's rejection of Journey has nothing to do with her tour on Aristotle - what if she turns out to be a Dalek 'duplicate' - which the Doctor discovered this during his moments with her in the TARDIS (before she regained consciousness) - and therefore he's rejecting her hidden nature as a 'Dalek soldier'? Yes, I know, out there-but what the hey! 


EyebrowsAttack
EyebrowsAttack

Quality review as always, great to read.  I don't agree that Clara was inconsistent at all, she was his carer all the way, sometimes gentle, sometimes not!  I also think that his simple get up there and do something clever was her reward of his faith in her as a result of her having been so right in her slapping him back into compassion and hope.  I also do think what was genius about this episode was to show that what is truly terrifying, for adults anyway, is not some monster or other but the slow or even total death of hope and compassion, whether it happens in a Dalek or a human soldier or even a timelord...

LeftCoastFan
LeftCoastFan

I've been lurking for a long time, enjoying tremendously everyone's discussion and analysis of my favorite show. Time to jump in! 

There is one thing in Into the Dalek which I don't think anyone has commented one, and I'd be interested in others' thoughts. Twice now, in both Deep Breath and ItD, the Doctor has commented about Clara not being a young woman, letting herself go, and the like. In the first episode it was likely due to his post-regeneration confusion, but why does he still think that now? Why does he reject the idea that she is young, even when she says she is?

I have a couple of ideas. One, he has just lived through the hundreds of years on Trenzalore, and Clara was present (for him) at both the beginning and the end of that time. Perhaps he unconsciously thinks she must have lived through all that time as well.

It also could be because he remembers her from throughout his long life, all the times her splinters have saved him, and maybe is still confused about just which Clara he is travelling with.

Or, just maybe, this is some sneaky Moffat foreshadowing, that this Clara is more than we know, or something other than we think...

Thoughts?

XavierDuPinz
XavierDuPinz

Wait. Did the Doctor save the soldier girl because he didn't want another... Journey's End?

(Btw, I didn't get the reference to The Waters of Mars.)

gameguy523
gameguy523

What I absolutely loved about this episode was the slower pace. The plot and resolution was a bit weak IMO, but the pacing was exactly what we need. It was slower, it took a moment to let the characters breathe and develop. And I felt the first 15 minutes, and the Danny/Clara scenes were phenomenal. 

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

It was interesting that Clara slapped the Doctor because he was smug in having his prejudices about Daleks confirmed, but then afterwards she put the idea in his head that there could be a good Dalek, which led to the solution of sorts...

Beasts_a_Snarling
Beasts_a_Snarling

I think the Doctor rejects Journey, because he is has learned that in a sense, he too is a Dalek. The Doctor wants non-soldiers around him that won't endorse his inner rage.

LordOfTime
LordOfTime

I'd guess Moffat wrote Missy and all the Danny scene.

And I think some of the charcterization (Doctor and Clara) is from Moffat. The Idea "Into th Dalek" came origanally from Moffat, how you should know, if you watched DW Extra.

dschram
dschram

The time frame from Clara's point of view confused me. As far as I can figure, to Clara "The Time of the Doctor" all took place for her on Christmas Day with "Deep Breath" possibly being a one day extension, I am assuming the Doctor got her back towards the end of her Christmas break, and now "Into the Dalek" is just 3 weeks later? So what - end of January, beginning of Feb for her? With "Dalek" being just a few minutes of her "real" time.

DrunkenDalek
DrunkenDalek

'I'm sorry 'uncharicteristically harsh "where the hell have you been?"' If someone abandoned you halfway up the next country you would be annoyed? And why does everyone seem to think that because Danny killed a non solider then he went up to someone and stabbed them? Has it not occurred that he could have killed someone while on tour mistaking them for a solider?

cyberbrayde
cyberbrayde

I loved it for what it is: Joy. I just love tuning in every week to an awesome adventure.

I'd Like a Jelly Baby
I'd Like a Jelly Baby

The only time I have truly seen the Daleks as threatening was the end of The Stolen Earth. I was only 10 at the time, and Tennant was my first Doctor, so the possibility of him being shot by a Dalek and regenerating unnerved me a bit. That's what the writers need to do, have them actually kill off major characters, or cause a Doctor's regeneration

EleventhChin
EleventhChin

Loved this episode, the CG was stunning, and it really feels like Clara is being useful to the Doctor this series. Maybe there's been a small character development, possibly because of the change in the Doctor(?) Anyway thoroughly enjoyed this ep. The scene with the Doctor facing the Dalek eye and the other with them crossing the eyestalk fluid was just fantastic to see. Overall - 10/10.


MrRazza, Investigating Missy and Mr Pink
MrRazza, Investigating Missy and Mr Pink

Preparations for Uni mean I haven't actually had a chance to rewatch it yet (though I think I probably will today) but I can reflect without some of the hype.


For me it was the most solid Dalek episode since 2008 (yes, I love The Stolen Earth/Journey's End, and proud of it too!). I have to say, I haven't actually found the Daleks threatening except on two separate occasions, and one of those wasn't this episode. Yes, they killed people, but background people who we had no connection with, everyone important survived. The two guards in the Dalek had roles almost identical to the good old redshirts of Star Trek, just with one of them getting a bit of speech before their inevitable demise. It needed a little more time to breathe, but the pacing wasn't particularly jarring and the CGI at the start more than makes up for the slightly dodgy mutant. The rejection of Journey simply feels like mishandled foreshadowing of the Doctor-Danny dynamic, his rejection of soldiers feels a little odd when it seems to be on moral grounds when a short while ago he was fighting a centuries-long war and flirting with the leader of one of the belligerent sides.

The premise was totally unoriginal, and meant I approached the episode with trepidation, but I feel it pulls it all off well. Capaldi dominates, with nearly every line and mannerism pulled off with perfection ("he's the top layer if you want to say a few words"). The I'mNotReallySavingYou scene is pulled off very well, the Missy scene is inserted beautifully and, while nothing remarkable and despite my misgivings above, the Daleks still have a better intimidating edge to them than they have for a while. As for Danny, well, too little of him seen to judge so far.

Overall, Into the Dalek is a good lesson in why simply killing doesn't make an episode darker or an enemy scary. It is a solid episode with a hackneyed premise, but ultimately feels more consistent and less flawed than Deep Breath did. A strong open to series 8.

Into the Dalek - 8.5/10

Deep Breath - 8/10

Jawsey
Jawsey

By and large I agree with your excellently thoughtful reviews as always. However I find the apathetic nature towards Clara disagreeable. I think this comes from issues with Moffat's characterisation of women generally, an issue you do touch upon frequently in your reviews (I don't have a problem with it myself, I think Moffat is ahead of the times defining his lead female characters as independent, feisty and strong-willed, but I understand the frustration of the one-dimensional nature that brings).

.

My issue is that your criticisms seem largely to be around one or two dodgy scripting lines, and while you have a valid point on them I think it over stretches the mark to suggest it detracts from Clara's characterisation, or at least as much as the second half of your review seems claim. It feels quite logical for Clara to be inconsistent with her responses to Twelve at this stage for example, she's only known him for two episodes' worth, so she has yet to find the balance between friend and minder that she instantly had with Eleven. 

On a similar note, it's a tough call to grumble for a paragraph on Danny Pink's slightly illogical classroom tearup (although having never been a soldier or knowing one it's hard to accurately quantify that), particuarly when we've had little more than a teaser on his character. But, what I will summarise with instead is that your reviews brings these indepth thoughts and arguments to the fore and allows me a platform to construct and debate them. That's why I always avidly await your reviews, because such is the quality of analysis I know you will generate such an enlightened debate





BenIsacremeeggRhodes
BenIsacremeeggRhodes

Hey hey, one character was called Journey Right? And they went into the center of the Dalek. This episode should have being called "Journey to the Center or the Dalek", alas they wasted that on the TARDIS episode.



VictorWong1
VictorWong1

There is one other thing about Doc not taking a soldier along: divided loyalties.

As a soldier, Journey has a loyalty oath to the authority that empowered her to carry arms on its behalf. The Doctor, being an independent agent, is fully aware that he may be going into situations where a companion who answers to another authority could be compromised. (The only reason why UNIT could be exempted is because, during his tenure with them, the Doctor wasn't going anywhere.)

nicktkh
nicktkh

The Doctor didn't let Journey come with him, because she's a soldier in mindset more than just status. She was more than willing to simply follow her orders, but The Doctor stopped her. I will concede that The Doctor just expecting Clara to turn the Dalek's memories back on with little to no expectation didn't make much sense, but I think her characterization was far from inconsistent. Her slapping him made total sense after seeing just how cold he was being to the situation, after all he DID tell her he needed her and she decided to be kind because her friend needed her, but then people were dying and they were going to die and it seemed like The Doctor only brought her along to show how he was right about all Daleks being evil. Also her "Where the hell have you been?" didn't really seem cruel in any way, he had abandoned her for three weeks in Glasgow, after all. A lot of the things they say to one another are jabs at each other, they're good friends who have known each other for some time, not lovers in their honeymoon phase, they're gonna make sarcastic and snide remarks to one another and be honest with each other.

Malohkeh
Malohkeh

Clara has far than just one defining trait, too. Dunno if we've been watching the same show.

MeglosProductions
MeglosProductions

I've made this point before, but I have to make it again: Everyone keeps saying how relieved they are that Daleks are finally killing people again. But does that make them scary? No. All I saw in this episode was a platoon of Daleks screaming "EXTERMINATE" while killing off random background characters who we didn't even get any chance to care about. That's unbelievably lazy writing and a cheap attempt to satisfy the fan base. In fact, it was my major issue with the episode (apart from the unbelievably rushed plot points). The Daleks just aren't scary anymore. They need another LONG rest just like in Series 6. And then bring them back once you figure out some good ideas for them. I do think this episode was decent, and I respect that it tried to do something different with the Daleks, but the episode for me felt a bit half-baked and could have been handled better.


Let's say 7/10

mclarke2410
mclarke2410

*sigh* i am so glad that someone else didn't receive this episode with such whole-hearted enthusiasm. I really really love, what they were trying to do here with the Daleks, with the Doctor and with Clara and Mr Pink, and Journey, but for me it was pretty ruined by the kinda awful writing and special effects.... The acting is absolutely spot on, but special effects wise, the shrinking and the random blue fluid that somehow replaced the glass in thedaleks eye stalk were terrible, the journey down the eye stalk with the Doctor's narration sounded like Ian Stewart narrating a visit to a particularly interesting volcano, and the antibodies were just rubbish. (I know it's a kids show, but surely anti-bodies that attack humans will attack the digested human too? causing an autoimmune reaction when the daleks use human protein? Just me? almost certainly lol but still....). Not to mention how they magically dried crawling down that tube once they left the stomach.... I also thought that maybe, you know, they shouldve developed one of the main characters who died for the Doctor and saved the day a bit more so we actually felt something at her sacrifice. The dialogue with the doctor melting into the daleks mind was particularly wonky. And i think i know the issue. Moffat is trying to bring real depth to the main characters, and mystery, and weave in philosophical themes about what it means to be human, and that is truly wonderful. Deep Breath felt absolutely perfect in that regard. But in both these episodes, such development has to be done very overtly, rather than with the subtlety and finesse it deserves. I really truly wish, that if Moffat wants to go down this route, and make the show into something resembling a modern epic, with deep characters and philosophical themes, whilst leaving it a family show, that they would lengthen the episodes. This would have worked beautifully with a bit more money and time spent on special effects, and another half hour of screen time. Cut the series down to 6-8 episodes if you must, but make them each an hour and a half, and this sort of thing would be much much better enabled. Thank you so much for trying this Mr Moffat, and your ideas are wonderful. The format is constraining what might be though.




LeftCoastFan
LeftCoastFan

@11th No More  Ooh, that's quite a scary, twisted thought - so you're probably right! I'll have to watch it again to see all those clues.

CeliaMoore
CeliaMoore

@11th No More "The first retort, the slap are aspects of her egomania, especially now that she's used to being in full control as a teacher." 



As a teacher in England she would not be allowed to slap anyone, it is considered assault. I think I am alone on this but if we start condoning hitting as ok or justified, then what are we teaching our children. 

The fact that it has become 'normal' for the doctor to be hit by his companions since 2005 says something for the modern era. Pre 2005 they screamed and argued with him but never hit him and he would never hit them, but by today's logic is it possible that one day he will lash out. I think not but that does not give his female companions the right to hit him. 

However that seems to be purely my opinion and others are fine with him being assaulted by women.



MJJ
MJJ

Four: All of the above.

The Listening Cat
The Listening Cat

Some very interesting ideas, both sound very plausible. Though maybe you're right, maybe there is more to it, Clara still has her mysteries after all.

Justjean
Justjean

@gameguy523 The fast pace is what I have learned to love in recent Dr Who episodes.  I found Into the Dalek really draggy, even boring.  Still love the Who concept and will continue to watch, but hoping the writing brings everything together.

XavierDuPinz
XavierDuPinz

Premise: I don't actually know how Christmas holidays work in Britain, while in my country they usually end around 7th of January. Assuming that the Doctor has left Clara in Glasgow on Christmas Day, after three weeks (mid January) the holidays should have been over. It is possible that Cathy decided to leave after the holidays and that Danny took over both Maths teaching (possibly from Cathy herself, since he would have no reason to go to her party if they were complete strangers) and cadet tutoring. This doesn't explain why the cadets practise in t-shirts in what could be January, though.

alwaysrunning
alwaysrunning

@dschram Figuring out timelines on Doctor Who is probably more trouble than it's worth. 

The MasterDoctor
The MasterDoctor

@Malohkeh Daleks in Manhattan/Evolution of the Daleks was awful.  Victory of the Daleks was terrible.  Asylum of the Daleks was fantastic!  One of my favorite episodes featuring the Daleks.  And Jenna Coleman was brilliant in it as was the characters revealed situation.  (I will say though that I never saw what all the hype over "every Dalek ever featured on the show" was about.  But then, ultimately, that didn't matter to me with that episode.)


Into the Dalek, I thought was good, but nothing extra special.

supermoff is alone. Listen...
supermoff is alone. Listen...

@mclarke2410 Also, what was wrong with the special effects? They were absolutely mind blowing, in my opinion. I think they rival the special effects of most blockbusters, and on a fraction of the budget! 



alwaysrunning
alwaysrunning

@mclarke2410 I think you might be taking the antibodies idea a little too literally - the Doctor was using it as an idea of what they are. They're an internal defense mechanism and where they jumped into is where the Dalek stores protein for use later so they're not going to enter there - which the Doctor states. 


As for the drying of the clothes well the tube they crawled through was hot so that could explain some of it but that's TV show short cut for you.

DW_girl
DW_girl

Finally, someone else who has realised the magic drying thing! Bad editing that was.

The Listening Cat
The Listening Cat

Though it could just be this Doctor's style of humour, he seems very fond of making fun of Clara's appearance, even though we can all see that his comments aren't remotely true!

The Finn
The Finn

@DW_girl RE: The drying: it was explained in dialogue that they were going through a decontamination chamber.

Rani Nose
Rani Nose

@DW_girl They probably could have used a transitional scene between being covered in gunk and being completely dry but I'm guessing nobody, cast or crew, wanted the actors to be wet all day as they filmed take after take.  That would be a nightmare in terms of make-up and shot continuity.

DW_girl
DW_girl

Alright, well thanks for clearing it up. The dialogue was easily missed really.