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Are Longer Stories Better? Five Classics

Guest contributor Tom Fitz looks at some of the longest stories in the show’s history.

hartnell-troughton-lost-in-time

Throughout the last couple of years Steven Moffat has exterminated the two-part format that the series had run with since its return in 2005 – the last story to last over one episode was The Rebel Flesh/The Almost People in 2011. The production team stated that “they don’t save us money at all” and would prefer to create ‘blockbuster’ standalone stories instead. It appears that this multi-episode hiatus is about to end with the new series but is this the right decision?

To answer whether these longer stories are a waste of time I am going to turn back time to the first seven years of the show where longer stories were very popular. Six-part stories were very common, especially in the Patrick Troughton era, but every so often they would break the six-part boundary and have stories which were seven, eight, ten and even twelve episodes long. A lot of these are very highly regarded and I believe are the evidence needed to prove that longer stories work and that they should be reinstated on a more frequent basis than what appears to be the case in Series Eight. Below are some examples:

Case One – The Daleks’ Master Plan

The-Daleks-Master-PlanThe centrepiece of Doctor Who’s third season was a TWELVE-part space epic – The Daleks’ Master Plan. It was such a massive story that it even had a prequel story Mission to the Unknown.

Despite lasting over four hours, I am
 gripped to this epic story from 
beginning to end. William Hartnell is on
 top form as usual, Peter Purves is
 brilliant as Steven and Jean Marsh is
 electric as Sara Kingdom. Furthermore the guest cast is sensational. Kevin Stoney gives one of his legendary villain performances as Mavic Chen and Nicholas Courtney is great as Bret Vyon. Unfortunately nine episodes are missing at the moment but in the three episodes that exist we can see how extraordinary Douglas Camfield’s direction is and makes you sad that we cannot see the rest. The Daleks are menacing, threatening and powerful in this story. Finally, the story touches on darker themes with the death of two companions: Katarina and Sara Kingdom.

Twelve highly recommendable episodes that help to prove that if done well, longer stories can be great.

Case Two – The Invasion

cybermen-the-invasion-londonI must confess that this is my all-time favourite story! Eight episodes but my attention is gripped from beginning to end. Douglas Camfield is directing again and does an extraordinary job again. Derrick Sherwin (writer) utilises the long story format to the stories advantage here. By having eight episodes both Jamie and Zoe are given a lot of attention to.

What could be described as ‘padding’ in the first four episodes is actually the writer cementing the relationship between the Doctor and Jamie. Both companions are given time to shine and some of their most memorable scenes are in this and scenes such as Zoe blowing up the computer using a complex computer language would not have been included if the story was not this long.

UNIT are introduced properly here and
 personally this is the best version of the organisation. It is a serious military organisation as seen throughout season seven but the characters inside the organisation are really given time, thus creating the perfect mix between the serious UNIT of season seven and the UNIT family vibe of season eight.

Case Three – The War Games

doctor-who-war-gamesComing in number twelve in the recent Doctor Who Magazine poll, this story is very highly regarded in fandom (along with all the others for that matter). Ten gripping episodes, great performances, great script – what is not to like. There are a number of great villains in this story as well from General Smythe, the Security Chief, The War Chief and then The War Lord. This all culminates in one of the most important episodes in Doctor Who’s history – the revelation of the Time Lords and the first ever proper hints into the past of the Doctor.

Case Four – Doctor Who And The Silurians

silurianMalcolm Hulke provides a totally original story, defying Terrance Dick’s beliefs that there were only certain types of story you could tell set on Earth, at the same time he provides one of the most intelligent, multi-layered story in Doctor Who’s history.

This seven-parter does something which many do not do – it makes the audience think. By allowing the audience a vicarious relationship with the story, Hulke adds another dimension to a story – offering a dilemma where there are not clear right answers.

The characters in this story are given time to breathe and therefore become fully rounded real characters. Despite being seven episodes long this story does not lag, instead is very engaging, revelling in the Earth bound format of the time.

Case Five – Inferno

doctor-who-infernoThe final story to break the six-part boundary in the 1970s is Inferno. I do not want to go into this one in too much depth since it has been recently reviewed on the site but to summarise – phenomenal performances, clever script, well-paced, gripping classic! This is one of the best examples of Doctor Who at its time and marks the end of the serious UNIT of Season Seven. From this point on, they began to become less serious as the warmth of the UNIT family became more prominent but a great final hurrah for the original UNIT and Liz Shaw.

There are many other great stories which could also be added including The Evil of the Daleks and The Ambassadors of Death. These stories are really popular.

Looking at the classic stories mentioned in this article one has to wonder why the modern day production team does not believe that the longer story format should be invested in further. If stories such as The Invasion, The War Games and The Daleks Master Plan can keep me and thousands of Doctor Who fans gripped from beginning to end despite being eight plus episodes long, why was the current production team to scared to have two part stories in series seven? Stories such as The Power of Three and Nightmare in Silver were crying out for a second part last season and I do hope this does not happen again. I am glad the Series 8 finale is going to be two episodes long but to me this is not enough.

Step back in time...

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134 comments
TaylorBoone
TaylorBoone

i think if you do a single it should be between 50-60 minutes, to prevent rushing, and finales/ regenerations should be at least two parts.  big issue i had with time of the doctor was that moffat put too much in such a small amount of time, THE END OF TIME was great cause it was two episodes, and then you were able to put in a twelve minute regeneration scene cause you had time too.   the time of the doctor part one shouldve ended with the appearance of the crack









LaraHarris
LaraHarris

I actually wonder how you can make the assessments and also wonder when the last time you watched these episodes was. Master Plan and Invasion do not exist in their entirety and as for Inferno... 

I rewatched inferno only a few weeks ago (having last watched it about 5 years ago), and while I would say that there was some cracking acting in it, (the whole alternate universe was brilliant) if we had an episode made like that today there would be an outcry and here are the reasons why. 


1. We never find out what the green goop is. 

2. We never find out why green goop is turning people into superhuman wolf men 

3 We never find out the point of the wolf men or why when infected with the goop the professor doesn't change.



4. We never find out why the drilling seems to have made the professor mad and WHY once this madness kicks in (the implication being that he has somehow been infected with the goop and it is driving him) he is so determined to get the drill to it's destination. 

Instead what we have is the Doctor trying to stop the drilling, failing and then going back to "our" universe and stopping it. The WHOLE, green goop/wolf men aspect of the story completely ignored. NEVER discussed. 

5. We are just supposed to accept for some reason at the end that the doctor just ups and leaves the survivors to die a gruesome death... 

Don't get me wrong, I have been a massive Whovian for nigh on 35 years and I can love the stories for what they are ( and I rewatch the 4th Doctor with what I think my family think is a frightening obsession but lets not pretend they are better then they are riding high on nostalgia and viewing through rose tinted glasses. 

I mean.... people get miffed with the Slitheen. Does anyone remember Meglos? One of my favourite stories, but the main villain, was a cactus... in a POT... 

I don't think stories of 6-12 episodes make for better tales. I *would* like to see some double's make it in this year( I know that's happening) and I would like to see stories get the time they need to resolve so we don't end up with disasters like TPOT but I also think you could argue that with Moffat, we've HAD story lines that last for a season or more and they haven't always been comfortable viewing.




videogamemad00
videogamemad00

The War Games is my favourite (TV) story of all time. It is one of the few I think is perfect.

Ohmygiddyaunt
Ohmygiddyaunt

After watching Classic Who for so long, I went back and watched a few episodes of NeWho and I often feel like it lacks something... I don't how to put it. It just doesn't feel the same. Not necessarily bad, but not good. Personally I wouldn't mind longer stories as it allows writers to even care about some of the quest cast. That's what I feel is missing sometimes. Guest characters aren't deeply developed or characterized. Just kind of there to help the characterization of main cast, like companions, which I feel like in most cases, NeWho does better. But in the case of the guest cast, Classic Who is almost always better. Yes the characters may be campy or ham (like Soldeed, Pex, or Brian Blessed's characters), but more thoroughly developed nonetheless. I definitely wouldn't longer stories as long as there's at least like around 10 episodes a season. One thing I thought was always sad was that in three years, Sylvester McCoy got less stories than Chris Eccleston got in one. Yes, The McCoy years had a practically non-existent budget or support from high ups at BBC (as half of them wanted the show to die), so he only got 14 episodes a season, but it still saddens me as I personally think of some of his stories as underrated and fantastic

Elionu
Elionu

With longer stories, there's time to actually bother to write the characters well (something missing in the New Series), both the main characters and the villains (Kevin Stoney is one of the reasons the Invasion is so good)

Petrichore050
Petrichore050

I always thought that victory of the daleks should certainly be in two parts as the whole story from start to finish seemed rushed. I mean im sure some people will disagree but i do think a part two to that story would be better than rushing the story like they did in my eyes.

AztecsDaleksAndCavemen
AztecsDaleksAndCavemen

Of these it's only The Daleks' Master Plan that I feel is too long. It grips you up to a certain point then it diverges your attention away with a completely unrelated episode and it's hard to keep focus after that.

microbat98
microbat98

Most series seven stories should have been two parts. I think The Power of Three fit the time frame the best, contrary to popular belief. The War Games is my all time favourite Doctor Who story.

Arkleseizure
Arkleseizure

Stories have natural lengths, but the natural length varies per story. I wish later production teams had the courage (or chutzpah) that saw an entire episode-worth of Planet of Giants thrown away and the whole thing made into a three-parter. The missing stuff isn't missed at all.

gwylock1
gwylock1

I've always been a massive supporter of longer stories, because in most cases a longer story means a more involved, multi-layered plot, with plenty of twists and turns. That's one reason I'm not as INTO New Who as the classics. It's just less engaging and less complex. Gone are quiet character moments that make the people seem more real, and gone are the complicated webs of deceit and sustained tension. Even great stories like "The Sontaran Experiment" and "The God Complex" would have been far better in my eyes had they been expanded, as both had a great deal of wasted potential, and both had more or less the same overall runtime. 

LoneRangerNinjutsu
LoneRangerNinjutsu

I'm still not very happy about the redesign of the Silurians in the new show. I prefer their more alien look in the original show.

Skylord Maldon
Skylord Maldon

I own the regeneration Box set and I have been meaning to watch the War games, its just wow thats a lot of episodes so I personally feel its too long. Though that doesn't mean that a good story can't be made, look at torchwood: Children of earth for the example :D. I think Doctor who could do with some longer stories but they need a lot of work on the script before they're ready :3

AnthonyMercer
AnthonyMercer

I know people here are going to disagree with me, but I consider Torchwood's "Miracle Day" an excellent example of how to do a long story.

supermoff
supermoff

I prefer single parters honestly. I liked the blockbuster format and thought it worked very well, with some exceptions.

Rani Nose
Rani Nose

It is not a secret that each episode has to be approximately 45 minutes long.  The producers, writers and directors are all very aware of this constraint.  There are many excellent 45-minute episodes.  If the writer/director/producer can't tell their story given the known constraint the problem is not the constraint it is the creative team.  There is no guarantee that having an extra 5, 10, 15 or 45 minutes to tell a story will result in a better episode.

parrot999
parrot999

I wish most stories were two-parters (The equivalent to a classic series 4 parter).  It just works much better with a series like Doctor Who, where the main setting and conflict changes with each story...  Despite the fact it would mean we'd only get about half the stories, they'd have more depth to them, which I think is a more than fair tradeoff...

Earthborn
Earthborn

Daleks master plan was an episode I really couldn't enjoy. After Nicholas Courtney's character was killed off the episode was really hard to get into. With missing episodes, a hard to follow story line which seemed to be hard strained and the lingering addition of black and white meant I found the episode boring. Yet I will admit I was shocked by the dark twist with sara kingdom's death. Most episodes end on a cheery note yet that episode had a really dreary ending


MaraBackman
MaraBackman

Very good examples. The War Games in particular manages to keep a tight pacing that makes the story feel so gripping, that you can easily forget how long it actually is. In the best cases the pacing and writing of the old serials is so strong that they manage to create truly complex and multi-layered stories that would be much more difficult to make these days, even as two-parters. That's why I've been thinking for a long time about the possibilities of changing the format at some point, to something closer to the format of the Classic show. 


Whenever this subject is discussed, most people seem to be in favour of going for fewer yet longer episodes per season. Personally, I would not want fewer stories at all, partly because the wait between seasons would feel longer. Also, I believe that a larger amount of stories offers more room for variation between stories and a bigger possibility that there might be something to enjoy for viewers of many different tastes. The unrealistic ideal for me would be to go for 22 50-minute episodes per season, as with most Star Treks and Farscape, but it seems very unlikely that would ever happen. So what I feel could work would be a season of twenty 30-minute episodes, organized into two-parters and multi-parters according to each story's need. Between the more demanding multi-parters they could have single "breather-episodes", that could focus on minor threats or character interaction.

JJJ567
JJJ567

Here's one... could Doctor Who benefit from cutting down episode number and increasing episode length like Sherlock?

PaulMann
PaulMann

Yes the multpart format is missed, one of my favourites being Genesis of the Darleks, but it is only one tool in the writers box of tricks and to be honest I don't believe it's gone: Name/Day/Time of the doctor can be viewed as one story in three acts, it has however evolved into 'story arcs' (Bad Wolf, Vote Saxon and who on earth gave Clara the Doctors number being foremost in my mind)  My ideal would be a story that involves a quick resolve to a problem (10 or 20 min) that opens up more questions that need to be answered (a mini or major arc) with minor characters playing a pivitol role (Strax saves the day and the Doctor - by accident or design) with a genuine what the ... happened there moment to lead to a future event.
















Silurian53
Silurian53

The Daleks, The Invasion, The Mutants, Genesis of the Daleks, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, The Seeds of Doom and The Armageddon Factor are some of my favourites.

Antee991166
Antee991166

The Invasion and The Silurians fully deserve their long stories in my opinion, but The War Games and Inferno do seem to drag a fair bit. I don't think we could have stories this long anymore, but maybe more 3-part stories like at the end of Series 3 would be good.

 Notsosmartguy  the dalek of Jersey
Notsosmartguy the dalek of Jersey

Longer stories worked well back then but this is now, people aren't as patient as they used to be. I honestly prefer a story that is a bit rushed than a story that gets dragged out with way to much padding and filler. The 45 min isn't always perfect but it more than gets the job done.

BazHood
BazHood

I will always prefer longer stories where the plot has room to breathe. The old four parters or the modern two parter, I think, works best. An hour just about works.

gunslinger19
gunslinger19

the problem with having so many parts to a story is that your forced to constantly create cliffhangers which work well once or twice but after that often seem forced and anticlimactic. longer episodes would answer this problem i think, and if that means less stories so be it.

JamesStroud
JamesStroud

Not necessarily Two-parters, but longer episodes need to be implemented. Limiting The Power of 3 to 45 minutes meant the ending was rushed - giving it 5 minutes more would have given longer to build tension and decrease the feeling that the sonic screwdriver is a magic wand. Limiting Asylum of the Daleks meant we saw very little of Amy & Rory's relationship falling apart - 5 minutes more could have done that.


But not every episode needs it. Midnight was the perfect length, The Girl in the Fireplace was the perfect length. And some episodes are, in my opinion, too long. In my eyes, Name of the Doctor could have been 5 or even 10 minutes shorter, which would have made it pacier, and cut down on the needless padding I feel it had (I know people like Name. I really don't, basically the only episode of New Who that I actively dislike)


And two-parters often do work, all the two parters with Chris Eccleston, Human Nature, Impossible Planet, etc... but not all stories are perfect for two parts. Some are: they have a cliffhanger mid way through, have a long but engaging plot, and, most importantly, were written as long scripts. Most of the episodes people have listed were not written that way, they just needed a few minutes extra to fill out the details of the plot, but 2 full 45 minute parts would just make the plot drag


The problem is, no TV network, let alone one like the BBC that has no adverts, is going to allow a programme to have unregular scheduling. If the first episode is 70 minutes, the second is 40, the third is 45, the fourth is 50... They would simply reject it, and ask that all episodes be made the same length, which leads to the seemingly "unfinished" episodes

Greenbed4059
Greenbed4059

The perfect example of how well a "longer" story could work in modern Doctor Who is Torchwood: Children of Earth.

Giving a story time to develop, both in terms of plot and character wise, has to be a good thing and in "Torchwood: Children of Earth" we were treated to one of the best Whoniverse experiences ever, (in my opinion). It had everything, a plausible story, great acting, cliffhangers, humour, pathos and a thought provoking plot.

If Doctor Who were to adopt this style of story telling it would surely rise to even greater heights. Ok, so we'd only get two or three "stories" per series but they would be given a chance to be told properly without the common complaint we hear a lot nowadays of the stories being rushed at their conclusion.

SteviePenny
SteviePenny

If they were to continue with the stand-alone blockbuster episode style format, where it was a different story every week, then I'd have to insist that each episode be one hour long, for the blockbuster was more like "lacklustre" as it had so much to do and introduce and deal with that it couldn't possibly fit an entire film-like plot in 45 minutes of time, which is why the resolutions always ended up being deflating and underwhelming. An extra 15 minutes (in my mind) would have really helped massively, allowing writers to flesh their ideas out without it feeling rushed.

For instance, there have actually been lots of episodes that could have done with extra time or another story to make it longer; The God Complex being one of them despite some probably finding this choice surprising. Personally, although the God Complex doesn't feel rushed in the slightest, I feel there was a missed opportunity in this gem of an episode. Personally, I think it could have been improved if it had been an hour long etc. to give it that extra 15 minutes to focus solely on the original group in the hotel, delving deeper into their relationship, perhaps showing how they got there or the way they worked. Moreover, I feel there were characters that would have been incredibly special to the audience if they were given time to be introduced and explored further additionally, who were never actually in the script at all. What I mean by this is the fact that playing with people's fears and hopefully overcoming those fears could have been a golden chance to communicate with the audience at home, helping build a connection, and possibly introducing (more) characters who would have been fearful of things some of the public might be fearful of too in their lives. For example, I would have loved it if a closeted gay character was introduced, so that his/her fear could be the "outing" of their sexuality, producing the moment where an emotional empathy could be felt from viewer to them, cementing a deeper attachment so the person watching could be more emotionally invested in the unravelling plot. The character who overcame his stutter was lovely, and that was a brilliant moment, but there also could have been more like that.

Not to mention, Series 7 was full of more stories which needed an extra episode to succesfully reach the potential they had. Asylum of The Daleks needed extra time to depict the broken relationship between Amy and Rory. Not to mention, it also needed an extra episode to explore the Asylum fully.

A Town Called Mercy needed more time so it could explore the entire town instead of just the Sheriff's office and a bar. What's more is the fact that the story between Jex and the Gunslinger could have been darker, if it had been given at least another 15 minutes to expand upon.

The Angels Take Manhattan. Rushed plot. Not enough Amy and Rory in their final episode.

Nightmare In Silver. Missed Potential. Two dimensional characters. Rushed plot. Unanswered questions. Rushed resolution. Needed another 45 minutes.

SephoraNeedSeries8
SephoraNeedSeries8

I think comparing Classic Who and NuWho is a big mistake. First Classic episode I ever watched was Genesis of the Daleks and I hated it. Yep, you heard me. Television has changed a lot, modern viewers get bored when watching 15 different plans failing before "something real happen". Of course I got used to it, rewatched it again and loved it. I'm just pointing out that even such a brilliant episode failed to get me hooked on Classic Doctor Who and it's only six episodes long. It's still an interesting topic but I don't think we can apply our conclusions to NuWho. 

Doctor Who-The Master
Doctor Who-The Master

I'm the classic era, this is how it went;

14: a series!

12+1: One timer,

10: One timer,

8: One timer,

7: about a dozen series 1-7 story's,

6: casual until 1979,

5: 2 because of production, and a one-off,

4: almost every story,

3: only in later years,

2: a cheep filler,

1: a prequel,

So evan a 2 part 90 min story is below almost every story. A one part 45 min story comes below a cheep filler.

Ottoman14
Ottoman14

Bring back RTD era format. 3 solid 2 part stories in a series. You know it makes sense.

edoe101
edoe101

I must confess, I have only seen two stories on this list - The Invasion and Inferno. Both were fantastic stories, The Invasion perhaps one of my favourites ever. My problem I have with stories 6 or more parts long is... well, I get bored, to put it bluntly. My prime example here is 'The Daleks'. It's first four or five parts were great but from then on I was just bored. I personally think that 4 parts is a good length for a classic story. I can watch it in one go (with 6/7 part ones I usually end up needing to go before I finish it) and I find them paced well enough so I enjoy them. The War Games and The Silurians are stories that I am interested in watching, but The Daleks Master Plan looks slightly to long for my liking - but hey ho, I will watch it some day.

Malohkeh
Malohkeh

I confess, most of those stories have too much filler for my tastes (though I love them nonetheless). Some are definitely paced better than others: The Invasion zips along wonderfully while The Daleks' Master Plan drags and sags.



SephoraNeedSeries8
SephoraNeedSeries8

@Ohmygiddyaunt I couldn't disagree more about the characterization of the guest cast. Nancy in The Empty Child, Lynda with a y in Badwolf,  Madame de Pompadour, Elton in Love and Monsters, Joan in Human Nature, Sally in Blink, River Song & Cal in Silence in th Library, Hariet Jones, Van Gogh in Vincent and the Doctor, The Dream Lord in Amy's choice, Canton in the Impossible Astronaut, Idriss in The Doctor's Wife, Lorna, Madame Vastra and Jenny in A Good Man Goes to War, Rita in The God Complex, Kate Stewart in the Power of Three, Emma in Hide, Mrs Gillyflower in The Crimson Horror, Tasha Lem in Time of the Doctor... Characterization of the guest cast is one of the strongest point of NuWho. 

Amy says Peter Davison is the Thirteenth Doctor!
Amy says Peter Davison is the Thirteenth Doctor!

I really liked Miracle Day, but I think that it's a case of "Better on DVD". If you can watch it at your leisure instead of having to wait a week in between each episode, then the pacing improves drastically. At least in my opinion. But really, my only issue with Miracle Day was the Jack timeline continuity mess in "Immortal Sins".


MetamorphmagusWho
MetamorphmagusWho

@supermoff   I enjoy them too. Having a two parter doesn't guarantee a better story than a single episode and I think it depends on the episode. Victory of the Daleks in my opinion would have been better if it had been a two parter (I still enjoy it overall, however), but The Power of Three only needed another five minutes to prevent the 'rushed' (though I don't really like using the word) ending. There are several other singles (e.g Amy's Choice; love it) that are better than two parters (eg The Rebel Flesh/The Almost People; not a fan... except for the cliffhanger). That being said there are some amazing two-parters, as well.

JJJ567
JJJ567

...or giving each episode a little bit more time and sort of meeting in the middle with like 8-10 episodes. Downton Abbey makes brilliant use of storytelling and character development through 8 episodes a season, Christmas specials, and with the openers and closers being longer episodes. Just another example of excellent British TV. I liked having three two-parters during a Who season though. 

BazHood
BazHood

@JJJ567 Nooooooooo! :P I want more Who, not less, hahaha....but I get your point :)

MeglosProductions
MeglosProductions

@JonathanEvanStern  While Genesis is a perfectly paced story, I think it had some padding (like the escape at the end of episode 2 and the infamous giant clam scenes)

The_Eternal_Dalek
The_Eternal_Dalek

@JamesStroud  The BBC are a lot more generous than some other broadcasters with adverts would be. A few episodes have been allowed to go up to 50 minutes in the past.

SephoraNeedSeries8
SephoraNeedSeries8

If I might add there are also great short stories in Classic Who : The Edge of Destruction (2parts), The Sontaran Stratagem (2parts), Black Orchid (2parts) and although it's a politically debatable one, The Happiness Patrol (3parts).


Elionu
Elionu

@edoe101 The length of the story works because they were meant to be seen one episode a week. While watching it all in one go is mighty tempting (and something which I have done), I agree, the longer stories drag a little if you watch them all at once. Best to space them out a little, even if only an hour break every three episodes or something.

Doctor Who-The Master
Doctor Who-The Master

The Daleks master plan is missing 9 eps. So if you do get recons, best wate and see if they find them. Because it takes me a day to watch it (The Day of the Daleks' Masterplan). And it is so hard to stay concentrated on still images for 10 eps ( including Mission to the Unknown). So just wate until they find it hopefully!!

BazHood
BazHood

@JJJ567 I could settle for 10, hour long episodes, I suppose ;) 


Game of Thrones is great at 10, hour long episodes, Fargo was great too, with 10 eps, but that was a one-off and True Detective was just sublime, with only 8 episodes. 

Thing is, I'm already smarting somewhat from us, seemingly, being 1 episode down for this year (12 instead of 13) plus a christmas cracker but the opener is 75 minutes and if the production values are as stellar as always then it's churlish to complain. It's a HUGE production to turn around.

Arkleseizure
Arkleseizure

Exactly half that: The Daleks, Marco Polo, The Evil of the Daleks, The Silurians, The Ambassadors of Death, Inferno.