News Categories
Archives

An Opinion Divided: The Time of the Doctor

Guest contributor Christopher Goring gives an alternate view on Smith’s final episode.

time-old-matt-smith-shouts

The Time of the Doctor was going to be badass. Eleven’s last stand. Matt Smith’s Doctor goes down in a blaze of glory against a carnival of monsters at the place of his death: the dreaded, mystical Trenzalore.  

It’s a shame, then, that Moffat opted to go in an entirely direction. The synopsis offered by the BBC’s extensive marketing suggested an action-packed, explosive episode as Eleven fought every monster imaginable. Instead, we got something of a slower episode which still manages to buckle under the weight of the extensive baggage established by Doctor Who‘s long-running plot arc.

As Jenna Coleman’s Clara struggles to prepare for a family Christmas dinner, Matt Smith’s Doctor has been lured to Trenzalore by a cryptic message alongside a menagerie of other creatures. Soon, he is thrust onto the surface of the planet where he discovers that the Cracks in Time from Series 5 have returned. The Time Lords – locked in an alternate universe after the events of The Day of the Doctor - are sending out a truth field in an attempt to force the Doctor to reveal his name. They believe that this will confirm that they have found a safe place to return from exile back into the Universe they left.

However, the Daleks – still embittered after their conflict with the Time Lords during the Time War – will do anything to prevent their rivals from returning. Knowing that the populace of Trenzalore will be massacred the instant that he releases Gallifrey, the Doctor is forced into a stalemate: if he says his name, the Daleks will desolate Trenzalore; if the Daleks desolate Trenzalore, the Doctor will release the Time Lords and the Time War will begin anew.

time-of-the-doctor-tv-trailer-(5) silentAs the premise suggests, this episode has a lot of ongoing narrative threads to deal with in a short sixty minute period. Aside from establishing all of the pieces in the stalemate, the story has to explain the origins of the Church of the Silence and create a convincing genesis for the Doctor’s regeneration. It’s hardly a surprise that the episode fails to adequately deal with the egregious pressure under which it is placed.

One thing that can be appreciated is the episode’s efficient and effective answers to plot arcs: throughout the episode, we discover that the Church of the Silence wished to prevent the Doctor from revealing his name in order to halt the development of another Time War, that the Kovarian Chapter broke off and that they were the perpetrators of the destruction of the TARDIS in 2010′s The Pandorica OpensThe Big Bang. It is somewhat disappointing that the answers don’t shift any paradigms or offer any shocking revelations: they are simply the answers that we always expected, belatedly provided in order to ensure the cogency of the narrative arc. Nevertheless, in the context of cogency, Moffat’s reveals are successful, proving once-and-for-all that Eleven’s unrelenting journey towards Trenzalore has been one, cohesive story.

In terms of the wider arc of the show, it is impressive that Moffat has managed to weave the aftermath of The Day of the Doctor into Smith’s final episode. At the time of the 50th Anniversary Special, its story about the survival of Gallifrey had seemed unexpected, given that the story of the Time War had only been mentioned in passing since The End of Time. However, with one masterful strike, Moffat has tied everything that has happened since 2005 into one story, building towards a single, unified climax.

It’s such a shame that the climax is an absolute mess. There are so many great moments in this story, so many segments which – when viewed in isolation – will elicit squeals of excitement. The naked Doctor, Handles the Cyberhead, the Church of the Papal Mainframe, the Confessional Priests, the wooden Cyberman, the clock tower regeneration and that final, heartbreaking scene are all beautiful moments. But, as a whole, the story isn’t satisfying because it’s less of a narrative and more of an assortment of dissonant, unrelated moments, stitched together in a desperate attempt to impress the audience.

time-of-the-doctor-tv-trailer-(9) weeping angelTake, for instance, the emergence of the Weeping Angels: that scene is exhilarating and both Smith and Coleman give convincing performances as the quantum-locked abominations close in upon them. It does not, however, have any place in this story. It has no pay-off, no build-up, no purpose in the context of the wider narrative. One would be remiss if they did not ask: why on earth is it here?

This problem occurs so many times within the episode. The Cybermen and the Sontarans feature in the story for no discernible reason, consuming valuable time which could have been dedicated to the Silence or the Daleks who are, y’know, the story’s main villain. The attack upon the Papal Mainframe and Tasha Lem’s (played by Orla Brady) conversion into a Dalek puppet seemed to exist merely to give another opportunity to spout dreary exposition. The Doctor’s baldness and nakedness seemed to have been written in not for thematically significant reasons but for the sake of a few cheap jokes.

The episode would have been massively improved by streamlining. Cut out the superfluous villains, and focus the story on the stalemate between the Doctor and the Daleks with the Silence acting as mediators. Remove the redundant sections of Clara being sent back to Earth and make the story slicker with greater momentum. Only with such alterations could the episode have been impactful as it wished to be.

In spite of its flab and its tendency to complicate relatively simple matters, The Time of the Doctor is redeemed by a triumviate of factors: Matt Smith’s wonderful performance, the development of Clara and its emotionally affecting final ten minutes.

time-of-the-doctor-tv-trailer-(12)jenna claraClara has always been something of a conundrum. As the primary mystery of Series 7B, the writing has deliberately kept us from learning too much about her or her origins. However, with the Impossible Girl story arc concluded by The Name of the Doctor, Moffat has been free to begin expanding upon her disappointingly few traits. Seeing her family offers some insight into the world she inhabits, while her unflinching loyalty reveals her ability to move beyond personal pain. We see that she’s kind, that she’s smart and that – more than anything else – she cares about the Doctor and those around her. Agreed, these are hardly the most complex or interesting of traits, but it is groundwork for further exploration now that Matt Smith’s regeneration is no longer looming upon the horizon.

smith-regen-speech-timeAnd Matt Smith was phenomenal. Every moment he was on screen was gold, more so than any of his prior performances as the Doctor. His work transcended the flaws of the material, making the jokes about nudity comical instead of lurid. His childishness at the story’s beginning is wonderfully juxtaposed with his rapturous fury at Handles’ reference to Gallifrey. He shows off his entire, magnificent range, proving that he is capable of being the funniest and scariest of Doctors. Once the story settles into its groove in its second Act, his performance is convincing: he feels wiser, just as powerful as he has always been yet resigned to the inevitability of his own death. Atop the clock tower, as he ruminates upon the sunset and the departure of his dear cybernetic companion, Matt Smith seems aged and weary. This is the end of him, and every facet of his performance assures you of it.

It’s brilliant that the final ten minutes fly in the face of the sense of impending doom and show the Doctor’s joy at getting another chance at life. Despite the prosthetics, Smith’s wild, physically-demanding performance conveys a youthfulness that he has never failed to bestow upon the part. As he swings his arms, gives a joyous speech on how nobody should tell him “the rules” and obliterates the Daleks above him, a sense of hope about the future reaches to the audience; if the Doctor is happy about change, then how can the audience be sad?

And that’s the best trait of the episode’s concluding scene. Despite the Doctor’s insistence that he will not forget “one line of this” and his ruminations on all that he has done in this body, there is a tangible sense of hope. He notes that we are “different people, all throughout” our lives and that “you gotta keep changing”: this regeneration, this renewal is a part of life that happens to everyone. This idea helps the final scene transcend the episode within which it exists, offering a reflection the glorious years of a brilliant Doctor while establishing a future which is not a devoid of virtue. Once the dust has settled on the botched attempts at grandiose, one must hope that The Time of the Doctor‘s astounding final moments will be its true legacy.

Step back in time...

COMMENT GUIDELINES

Please be civil and keep article comments relevant and on topic. Flag and report any offensive/trolling behavior, or contact us with details.
Please do not post SPOILERS including anything from leaked episodes! Your account could be banned. For complete details on our comment policy please read.
135 comments
timeyblimey
timeyblimey

The majority of legitimate reviewers as well as fans, that I've seen, liked it (not counting some freelance blogs that score hits by spewing hate). No episode will ever please 100% of the fans, I don't care who writes it. If all your little changes were made to your satisfaction, it would just mean 100s of DIFFERENT fans would be pissed at the episode. You call it a slower episode while others complained the pace was too fast. Considering it didn't get a full 2 hours like 9 and 10's final episodes, it did a fine job tying so many loose ends (if the Angels hadn't been in it, many fans would have cried "where are the Weeping Angels!!?" Again, you can't please everyone).

Since when do the random jokes in any Doctor Who episode have "thematically significant reasons"?? While I agree with some of your points, and most of the second half, it seems like the episode just caught you on a bad day. As for a cohesive whole to the story, how about Smith's Doctor being the one who always flees his problems, finally committed to stay put to save a whole planet? Seems worthy enough for an episode theme to me, given only an hour. All the details and particulars, my Creative Writing professor would say, make a story rich.


Even so, I was pleasantly surprised by the whole question storyline. You couldn't possibly have guessed the story until after the episode RIGHT BEFORE it, that the Time Lords would be suspended in another universe and "Doctor Who?" was the key to them coming back, thus threatening to restart the Time Wars! Admit it, that was clever, not "answers we always expected", please. As someone who really became a fan of the show with Smith and Moffat's arrival in The 11th Hour, this was a pretty remarkable episode to say goodbye to the team with. Not perfect, the old man make-up was a low point, but still one of my favorite episodes of all time. Karen's scene and taking off the bow tie, and Clara's humanity, like you say, are the things that make it a classic.

VortexDan
VortexDan

Can we mention the fact that The Doctor was complete jerk who shunted Clara away "for her own good" and despite everyone being convinced that she's so strong and clever she just sits in her flat and cries about it? Rose broke the damn TARDIS when the Doctor told her what to do. Why the hell does 11 get a free pass?

PeterwasmyDoctor
PeterwasmyDoctor

I watched this on Xmas Day with my 4 year old son who new he was going to lose his Doctor. He loved it & loved the brief glimpse of 12. However I will never forget his little statement at the end 'Daddy I will miss my Doctor' - brought a tear to my eye. For that reason it will always be a special episode as I knew I had passed my love for the show on successfully.

stig oien
stig oien

A very good review which is able to point out all those unneccesary parts. I wholeheartly agree with you. Time of the Doctor is a sad ending of Matt Smith's era. And not good sad, like a tear jerker. In the case of this story, simpler would have been better.

Warisfiller
Warisfiller

At least it was better than DOTD


Should have been a two parter but for some reason Moffat hates them, one of the reasons why quality has dropped ever since S5

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

When I watched Name of the Doctor and Day of the Doctor, I thought BRILLIANT! and immediately watched them again because I enjoyed them so much.


After watching Time of the Doctor, I felt disappointment...

After subsequent viewings it's grown on me, but still tries to cram too many unrelated things into one episode, and returning to a Pond era storyline from 2011 after it had barely been mentioned in S7 was awkward.

Matt deserved a 2 parter, or rather 2 separate but linked stories. On Christmas day, a generally happy story, with the Turkey, Clara's family, a bit more about her, a bit of crack resolution etc, then on New Year's Day more of the time on Trenzalore, with time to cover the S5 S6 arc.

I still find aspects of Eleven's behaviour towards Clara out of character, when you consider how close they were in Day of the Doctor. The Doctor might not endings, but for him to send her away TWICE against her will was odd.

NumberNine
NumberNine

I wish I could see this episode the same way as some of the people in this comment section. I felt like this final episode put a sour taste in my mouth about Matt's entire era. It's almost insulting to his terrific take on the Doctor

Liana21
Liana21

OK, it's not perfect, but I love it, I don't know why, but I love it.

I miss you Matt

DW_girl
DW_girl

When I first watched 'The Time of the Doctor', I was a bit disappointed. Mainly because the pacing felt all over the place- There were things in it which weren't necessary and which consumed time which could've been available for proper plot development; and also the transition of The Doctor into an old man on Trenzalore seemed to be too quick for me- 300 + years in the space of 20 minutes. The regeneration scene was simply superb though! I cried when Eleven hallucinated Amy, when he made his 'Doctor speech', and when Clara asked him not to change (oh, and the scene with the poem and the cracker was an utter tear-jerker too!). Also, Capaldi's first scene was very exciting! The Time of the Doctor could have been better though- possibly if they'd made it a two parter like The End of Time or something.

MikeUK2011
MikeUK2011

I enjoyed The Time Of The Doctor, not so much The Day Of The Doctor though, but you can't please everyone. I'm happy with the show in general.

AztecsDaleksAndCavemen
AztecsDaleksAndCavemen

I felt it was overcomplicated but then I suppose that summed up Matt Smith's time on the programme. I did also feel like Steven Moffat was repeating on himself. It was a quite like the The Pandorica Opens/ The Big Bang in that various monsters gathered around to attack. 

Having said that, every Doctor Who story has its pros and there were some great concepts - a planet where people must tell the truth, a talking cyberman head as a companion. It felt old and new at the same time.

TheRiseOfTheTwelfth
TheRiseOfTheTwelfth

I could not agree with you more. Everything you've said in this fantastically written article is absolute truth in my eyes. Sitting down to watch this at Christmas I was so excited; I wanted to love this episode SO much. And it just didn't deliver. The first twenty minutes were brilliant, but it completely lost its way after that. Trying to answer so many questions in a satisfying way in the space of an hour was always going to be a difficult feat, and coupled with the task of showing the "endless, bitter war" with the Doctor and his greatest enemies, it was simply never going to succeed as an episode, let alone one that acted as a finale not only to the 11th Doctor but to a whole era full of twisting and complicated arcs. I couldn't help feel like Clara by the end of it, only going back to see snippets of a greater story. Considering Tennant had a two-part finale, and the second part was over an hour long, surely Smith deserved more than a measly 60 minutes, especially in the 50th anniversary year. Because if there's one thing this episode proved, even though it didn't need to, it's that Smith - as you say - transcended the flaws in the story to demonstrate how he is simply one of the best Doctors of all time.

Richy Woo
Richy Woo

Doctor Who is something that people get passionate about, sometimes our passion is not aligned with peoples equally passionate opinions. If you want everybody to agree with you, the internet really is not the right place for you. I agree with maybe 10% of this article, but I still think its really well written and worth reading. 

TheNameOfTheDoctor
TheNameOfTheDoctor

To be honest, I think this episode summed up Smith's era. Great characters and ideas just not all that well executed. Here's to hoping that this episode signaled the end of weak, strung together stories to make way for some proper corkers with Capaldi :)

JamesCresswell
JamesCresswell

I must admit, I am in the camp that enjoyed Time. Having said that though, I do agree it could have been so much better with just the Daleks as the main threat.

Trouble is with Moffat, he tries to cram in too many ideas into a single episode or special. Sometimes it works as in the 50th. Other times though it falls flat on it's face, such as most of series six. Time was somewhere in between in my opinion. Matt Smith as usual was brilliant. Even when some episodes was dire, he was the saving grace. Capaldi has some big shoes to fill in that respect. Just as Matt Smith did when Tennant left.

The one thing that bothers me in respect to Time, was the quick regeneration. Yes I know it was because of a new regeneration cycle, but for me it was a disappointment not to see a proper change. Blink and you missed it.


Overall I would give this episode 7/10

gunslinger19
gunslinger19

sorry, I have to disagree because i loved all of this episode. it wasnt perfect, they should have either dropped the angel/cyber/sontaran cameos or expanded on them enough to make them seem relevant to the story. the sudden leaps through time could have been done better, perhaps we could have seen the whole thing from Clara's view rather than have a narration from Tasha. that would have made the whole scene seem more shocking as the doctor's sudden ageing would have been a surprise and a shock. but overall, the acting from Smith made the episode gold. of course, the final 15 minutes was the best, Clara's goodbye, Smith's towertop speech, the destruction of the daleks, Amy's return and the final regeneration were some of the most beautiful scenes iv ever seen ever. the rest of the episode does seem disjointed, but i think that it gets better on repeat viewing. it serves as the perfect end to Smith's doctor, showing that after the 50th he really has stopped running away.i dislike kids in dr who, but seeing the doctor forget who Barnabelle was was heartbreaking. imagine if he forgot who Amelia was!Clara's returns to Earth seemed somewhat slow but i actually found the nudity thing to be surprisingly funny and some insight into Clara's family is always welcome. I really liked Tasha Lem, and thought she had much more chemistry with the doctor than River ever did, really hope she returns. and i loved the ways in which the arcs were tied up, "I thought i left the bath running."finally, the inclusion of the one last bow poem was brilliant and makes me grin with excitement every time i hear it! overall, a 10/10 and my favorite regeneration episode ever!

Seekles
Seekles

It's not a love / hate story. It's a well loved story with a vocal minority who go on and on and on and have been for the past five months.

cyberbrayde
cyberbrayde

I would of loved it if they went straight into action. Straight into Trezalore. No Clara making Dinner sub-plot. No checking things out sub-plot. Start with a scene where the Doctor is running for his life in a jungle inhabited by an alien tribe that wants to kill the Doctor. Like Indiana Jones, they could of done. And the thing the Doctor stole was an old book. So far, 4 minutes. He goes picks up Clara and shows her the book, this leads to Trenzalore to a time where everyone has assembled. And The Doctor's greatest enemies have forced him to go in. Once in, he unlocks the secret, Doctor Who, and then the enemies begin their decent on Trenzalore. So far, 15 minutes. The Doctor  has to protect Christmas City, and the bell. Have 10 minutes on Daleks, 10 minutes on Cybermen and Others (mixed range) This leaves 15 minutes left. Have a huge 12 minute battle and final 3 minute regeneration. WOULD BE AWESOME! But I love the Time of the Doctor.


BazHood
BazHood

Great article. I'm in the camp of mostly despising the story. It displays all the, now usual, Moffat traits of.........to hell with sense or logic, let's just chuck everything in. "Lets have a wooden Cyberman because....well....a wooden Cyberman would be cool....and we've done a stone Dalek....so yeh. Cool" The thing is....wooden Cyberman IS COOL but here...it's just gratuitous! Utterly pointless. Thankfully, Matt is brilliant throughout, even under the TERRIBLE old prosthetic. I also happen to think the Xmas special shouldn't NEED to be Xmassy. Make it the season finale AND a barnstormer! Having to link to Xmas must be so restrictive so just make it a feature episode and be done with all the fake snow and rubbish.


WiblyWoblyTimyWimyMOFFAT
WiblyWoblyTimyWimyMOFFAT

Thank you! THANK YOU! For this beautiful article, it just made my day. And I must say the episode was pretty perfect till the church was transformed to silence (loved that scene) after that it had to much clara at home and the things we saw of trenzelore werent all good. I wouldeve liked more time (two parter) for the trenzelore arc, so we see more of the siege and battle. I wished me also an alternate timeline, where the doctor dies. But overall is the episode still (very) good.

craig33
craig33

I always go in an entirely direction. It would be foolish to attemt otherwise. "TIME" was a fantastic end to a first rate Doctor. Thankyou Moffat.

supermoff
supermoff

@VortexDan  Just...stop commenting. Every time you comment you prove yourself to be an enormous idiot who doesn't pay attention to any part of the show. 

TheNightmareChild sees into your soul!
TheNightmareChild sees into your soul!

@VortexDan  "Why the hell does 11 get a free pass?"  

-I don't even know what you mean by that?  What do you mean "free pass"?  Like, have people been giving Nine and Ten a hard time for sending their companions away at various points?  Because I haven't seen any of that, and for my part, I've never had a serious problem with it.  Not in this or any case.  The Doctor was genuinely concerned for Clara's safety-you can argue whether or not sending her away was called for, but he wasn't being a "complete jerk": that decision came from a place of caring and concern for her and for her family who, if anything happened to her, wouldn't have any clue.  She would just have left her home on Christmas Day and never come back.  


"...she just sits in her flat and cries about it."  

-Yeah, the second time.  The first time, she grabbed hold of the TARDIS and hung on for dear life while she was flying through the Time Vortex.  The second time, she was holding her family's turkey and before she had fully grasped what was going on, the TARDIS was already on its way back to Trenzalore.  What else exactly was there for her to do at that point?  It's not like the TARDIS was there for her to break.  And not to diminish Rose's actions in Parting of the Ways, but she herself did a fair amount of crying when she was brought back before she picked herself up and broke into the TARDIS with Mickey's help.  


I don't want to discredit your feelings, but it feels like you're just looking for reasons to be angry at this episode.  There are plenty of things to pick apart in it and be annoyed by, but this just isn't one of them.

 Notsosmartguy  the dalek of Jersey
Notsosmartguy the dalek of Jersey

@VortexDan  oh geez you again.  1. She would've died on trenzalore had the 11 not sent her away. He assumed it was the end of the road but he wanted her to have a good life. 2. Did you forget the part where Clara rode the tardis "Jack Harkess Style" back to the Doctor.Then the 2nd time the Tardis went Back to the Doctor she got the message that he didn't want her to comeback, what the hell was she supposed to do? But you where probably too busy whinging like a RTD fanboy instead of actually paying attention.





Malohkeh
Malohkeh

@Warisfiller He doesn't "hate them". However, he didn't feel any of the stories desperately needed a second part. There's a difference....

Also, the idea of a "quality drop" is entirely subjective. Going by objective measurements (viewing figures, audience appreciation figures, reviews) there hasn't been any drop.

 Notsosmartguy  the dalek of Jersey
Notsosmartguy the dalek of Jersey

@TakeTheType40  agreed nice to see I'm not the only one who loved the wooden cybermen. The dinner scenes where something I related to personally because that's how my family is getting together for holidays like thanksgiving and Christmas.




TottersLane
TottersLane

@JamesCresswell  The protracted regeneration scene has been done many times - this was different and was a shock - whoomph! New Doctor!!

BazHood
BazHood

@Seekles  It's fairly clear to see, simply from this thread, that it's loved by younger 'Smith/Tennant fanboys/girls and hated by classic series oldies, like myself. I like a cohesive, logical storyline, see? Not gimmicks and "how clever am I" plot machinations. 

Rani Nose
Rani Nose

The wooden Cyberman wasn't at all pointless. As established in earlier episodes Cybermen continually try to improve themselves. "Upgrade in progress" and all that. Using a wooden Cyberman to get through the force field is just another logical upgrade attempt by them.

VortexDan
VortexDan

@TheNightmareChild @VortexDan  There is a lot to pick apart, you're right. But I just want Clara to have had a say. When she didn't, I'd have liked the show to say "that was bad, she should have a say in things" but it didn't. When Rose was crying part of it was sad but part of it was anger at the doctor and anger at being stuck at home. And she wasn't just sad because the perfect loverly clever boy  was gonna die she was sad because she'd gone beyond herself and seen the stars and universe and she'd lost that. Unlike Clara, she was sad for herself not the man she has a crush on

Malohkeh
Malohkeh

@TheNightmareChild @VortexDanNot only did Rose cry, but one could argue that she isn't even the one who "broke" the TARDIS. After all, she wasn't the one driving the construction vehicle.

VortexDan
VortexDan

@Notsosmartguy the Superior Venom @VortexDan  My issue is that no sort of idea is put forth for what CLARA wants. It's all What HE wants, all about him. He knows best for her and she can't do anything about it because the doctor is perfect and lovely and infallible and sexy. And I think they should have had her do the harkness rodeo and that was it, but they had to say "Bad girl. You disobeyed the Doctor and you shall be punished. How dare you try to have agency" and so they sent her back. And I don't try to be an RTD fanboy, but at least when he was running it women were well written and we had some POC!

TottersLane
TottersLane

@BazHood @Seekles  In defence, as a fan since classic series 1, I have to say that I loved this episode; there were so many things that I enjoyed about it that it would take as long as the episode itself to list them all. I too like a cohesive and logical storyline, and this one had that and lots more besides.

Seekles
Seekles

So? It's completely irrelevant. The people who post comments here don't represent a majority, they're not the general consensus. The Time of the Doctor is well loved by the majority, much like most Doctor Who stories that broadcast, but there's always a vocal minority who try to make their voices heard and come off as a majority. That's what you're doing, but let it be known that you are very much an insignificant minority.

As for "Smith/Tennant fanboys/girls" and "classic series oldies", don't make me laugh. A complete sweeping statement and an insulting one to boot. Categorising fans into two categories? Whatever happened to simply being a Doctor Who fan? There are no divides between "classic" and "new". If someone happens to particularly like the David Tennant or Matt Smith era, then so what? They're still fans of Doctor Who.

BazHood
BazHood

@Rani Nose  It was a gimmick, barely justified by a throwaway line, nothing more. I know all about Cybermen, believe me. Their use of fab new catchphrases with every new appearance is also pointless. Upgrade in progress! Indeed! Delete! Delete!

VortexDan
VortexDan

@TheNightmareChild @VortexDan My issue Is I want Clara to have a say in it, like Rose did. I want her to fight it and show the Doctor he's wrong and stupid for sending her away. I want the show to look at the companions as equals to the doctor, not playthings for him to protect and mess with. It's about agency

TheNightmareChild sees into your soul!
TheNightmareChild sees into your soul!

@VortexDan @TheNightmareChild  I didn't get that from the episode.  I felt like Clara was just as sad for herself as she was upset for the Doctor.  But it takes all kinds, I suppose.  I also disagree with the notion that the Doctor is just flatly wrong for sending his companions away every single time.  I just don't think it's that simple.  Sure, the Doctor takes a certain amount of agency away from them when he does that, but at the same time, if he asked them if they wanted to stay they would probably say yes, keeping them in a situation that is probably well over their heads and will more than likely get them killed.  So the way I see it, that decision when it is employed is usually a little bit right and a little bit wrong.  Just like Rose's decision to come back in Parting of the Ways.  Rose had her family and friends to think about; people who, by all accounts, care very deeply for her (in their way).  So there is a certain selfishness in Rose's decision to go back, even if Mickey was complicit in it.  But she was also going back to try and save the Doctor, a noble venture by any measure.  My point is the Doctor doesn't live in a black and white universe and sometimes he has to make decisions that are a certain number of parts questionable and  another number of parts totally right given the immediate circumstances, and that just happens to have been it on more than one occasion.





Rani Nose
Rani Nose

No, I think you're watching in exactly the way the show is meant to be watched.

 Notsosmartguy  the dalek of Jersey
Notsosmartguy the dalek of Jersey

@BazHood @Rani Nose  I don't wanna sound rude but I really don't see what the big deal is. The wooden cybermen was a fun idea the kind of ideas I watch this show for. Doctor Who in my mind is just a fun show full of amazing locations great character s, and creative monsters. But I guess I'm not watching the show right.