News Categories
Archives

2nd Opinion: Deep Breath

David Selby and John Hussey both give their own verdict on the Series 8 opener.

capaldi-mirror-deep-breath

David’s Verdict

Time, in most senses, remains at the heart of Doctor Who – and not just conceptually. The first episode of this new series employed time as a palpable leitmotif, present in both poetic themes and periphery atmospherics: upon arrival, the new Doctor is accompanied by a soundtrack amid which can be heard the workings of clockwork; he then passes out, presenting us with a brand new clock-face title sequence. Soon after, the Doctor sells his watch; he’s introduced to the antagonist of the week, a clockwork droid whose appearance has evolved over time, and any methods of escape – holding your breath, not blinking – are eventually conquered by the passing of time. Time has both a constructive and damaging effect on characters and events. Time, from many perspectives, embodies change; the change which fuels a revitalized series and a number of frustrated characters.

deep breath promo batch (7)Continuing to address time: in a more literal, real-life context, Deep Breath is largely enriched by an extended run-time. At times, especially during the first half, the pacing has a minor habit of dropping. But on consideration, I’d far rather an episode that’s on the mere cusp of lethargy than the likes of what we were served in Series Seven; slapdash scripts full of wasted ideas. Deep Breath, at the least, welcomes a number of ideas and serves them each appropriate justice. Or, if it doesn’t, it warrants future stories the ability to do so. The only worry for future stories now is whether they’ll continue to impress with the ludicrous slot of forty-five minutes. I’m not questioning Moffat’s storytelling, but whether such a short space of time would really do it justice.

The ‘Half-Faced Man’ almost resembles in concept, appropriately for the era, the creature from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: “His limbs were in proportion, and I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful!–Great God! His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun white sockets in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion and straight black lips”. More fascinatingly, it would only seem to be a clichéd antagonist if judged superficially. Typically with such creatures, they represent dehumanisation: take Auntie and Uncle from The Doctor’s Wife. They’re repaired so frequently that all that was human about them is lost, drained to the extent where they even lose their primal fear of death. The Half-Faced Man signifies, you could say, a failed humanisation: a robot which has made itself human, half-able to appreciate the beauty of the world, but half-cursed to a wretched existence pursuing an ostensibly pointless cause. It is also easy to draw parallels between the Half-Faced Man and the Doctor. Both are different men to who they once were; both as unknown to themselves as to others. I found the reflection scene a particularly effective method of conveying this.

Whilst I’ve never hated them, I was admittedly surprised at the use of the Paternoster Gang in this episode. It seems that they’re being taken more seriously at last. Both Vastra and Jenny seem like tangible, multifaceted personalities rather than just gimmicks; even their relationship comes across as something worth investing in, instead of just a statement. I remain unsure about Strax. The comedic moments are undeniably hilarious but can be quite jarring in certain contexts (for example, Vastra and Jenny’s dramatic entrance). His willingness to kill himself to save his friends, however, goes to show how far he’s come as a character, and I hope to see his loyalties challenged in future episodes. As different characters, they provide an alien perspective on regeneration; particularly Vastra, who gelled well with Clara, though it was a shame that Jenny and Clara didn’t get more screen-time together. Deep Breath is easily one of Clara’s finest outings. She’s genuinely alone, trapped in an unfamiliar world with a man she no longer knows.

Skipping ahead, there’ll no doubt be controversy surrounding the phone-call scene. I for one loved it. The Time of the Doctor didn’t deliver a definite farewell between Eleven and Clara, so a duologue was fulfilling. It’s also a reminder for the audience that the Doctor we now know is the same man. Capaldi is brilliant – harsh, unpredictable, and often terrifying. And, of course, unable to express himself in the way that previously charismatic incarnations were able to. It takes Eleven’s convincing way with words to win Clara over, but it’s not remotely detrimental to the man that Twelve is.

Of all new additions to the show, one of my favourites is a renewed sense of uncertainty. The Doctor believes the Half-Faced Man is chasing a fictional place, yet the Promised Land is revealed to be real after all. The Half-Faced Man dies, but how remains ambiguous: did he fall, jump, or was he pushed? Even the exact circumstances by which the Doctor acquires the tramp’s coat are left for the viewer to decide. It brings a darker edge to the show. ‘Dark’ doesn’t necessarily mean explicit. Often the implied are more thought-provokingly unsettling than what we blatantly see.

The Promised Land seems like a fascinating arc. I personally hope that Missy hasn’t been in a relationship with the Doctor. After River Song and arguably Clara Oswald and Tasha Lem, it would seem repetitive for the main actor to have an underlying sexual chemistry with another. I’d rather think that Missy is an unhinged woman who fantasises over the Doctor (“Because he loves me… so much”), even though they’ve never actually met. Perhaps, as the Gatekeeper of Heaven, she’s been unable to keep a hold on the Doctor who continuously evades death. I would also speculate that ‘Paradise’ isn’t quite as idyllic as it’s made out to be. If the show really is going ‘darker’, then surely a corruption of heaven itself would be the ultimate twist of the series.

Whilst superlative, Deep Breath wasn’t perfect. The dinosaur makes for a gripping opening and a poignant scene posthumously, but it raises too many questions to be taken seriously. How was it pulled forward through time by the TARDIS? And why didn’t it go down in history? We’d only just got rid of the Cyberking. Thankfully, there weren’t any production slip-ups. Ben Wheatley’s disconcerting direction was noteworthy and Murray Gold’s soundtrack was stirring without being intrusive.

Deep Breath was a success. It may not have had the fast pace or originality of Smith’s debut, but it coped well on its own as something which provided an insightful new vision of what it means to quite literally become a new man.

John’s verdict:

Doctor Who is back people. And I can say with confidence that it’s better than ever. Peter Capaldi got one hell of an opening as the Doctor and it would seem his journey has just begun.

‘Deep Breath’ hit everything right I think and really went about to demonstrate what Capaldi could do as the Doctor. We saw different emotions out of him from comedic moments of him ranting over the purpose of a bedroom, all the way to other spectrum of his darker side eagerly persuading his foe to choose defeat through self-destruction.

Of course the Twelfth Doctor started off mad, being all over the place and unable to fully function his mind. This transition opened intriguing doors of discovery that we went through with the newly regenerated Doctor. We had him coming to terms with being Scottish and of course him finally pondering on the faces he randomly gets given. It poses the question of whether they are random faces.

During this period of recovery we saw that Clara wasn’t very accepting. Having had time to come to terms with her unlikely responses I can at the very least now show some understanding towards it. My Cultfix review did jump to conclusions over her characteristics but I still hold my ground over what I said. Some of her responses were just harsh and selfish.

The idea that her Doctor was gone meant that the man in front of her was no longer the same person. Yes I can understand that she would be broken because of this. Her best friend was gone and will never come back but she doesn’t really give the new Doctor a chance to explain himself, nor express the fact he was still the same man.

deep breath promo batch (8)Also her comments over his age were just plain silly. Clara of all people should know that the Doctor isn’t a young man but an alien who walks amongst eternity. Some of her reactions were truly understandable but I still can’t help but feel it was sometimes over the top. It was as if her dialogue was written for a character that was totally unaware of regeneration but Clara was well acquainted to this procedure by that point.

The fact that Madame Vastra had to step in and basically give her a good slap through her brilliant dialogue and the comparison with her using her veil to rid away the ignorance of humanity just made the entire ordeal all the more infuriating. I just assumed Clara would’ve taken this a lot better but instead fell flat as a character and as a friend and almost completely abandoned the Doctor through blind thinking.

Speaking of Madame Vastra, I found her, Jenny and Strax were once again used wisely and helped to get Capaldi onto his feet. They at all times helped to reassure the viewer that the Doctor was still the same man along with helping to move the story forward. They all once again proved that their individual values as characters each bring something to the stories they appear in, with Strax most notable for being a clown.

The return of the Clockwork Droids was an interesting choice by Moffat. They weren’t exactly the most memorable foe in my eyes and certainly didn’t stand out within Moffat’s line of original creations. But alas Moffat proved that they could easily be incorporated into a second story with ease and better still received further development.

These secondary Droids were revamped to share a sort of steam-punk style design and became even more sinister and scary than the originals. The idea of them murdering innocent people and harvesting them for spare parts for themselves and their ship was just disturbing. The Half-Face Man showcased as a cold and totally inhuman villain. All of his scenes left you feeling uneasy just by his mere appearance.

The clever part of the story was the idea of hiding from them through holding your breath. That alone created some tense and torturous scenes which forced Clara to undergo a lonesome ordeal which was painful to watch. The mere thought of holding your breath in a life and death situation is just cruel. Moffat has once again used an everyday thing and turned it on its head in a horrific way which makes his writing all the more exciting and clever.

The Twelfth Doctor showcased that he could be a truly alien and dark Doctor. He abandoned poor Clara without any true remorse and later attempted to force the Half-Face Man to go against its basic programming by killing itself. The end result left you with an ambiguous scene, leaving you wondering whether or not the Twelfth Doctor actually did push the creature out of the craft. I myself am in favour of saying he did do it.

The theme of the episode was really all about accepting Peter Capaldi as the Doctor and this somewhat explains Clara’s behaviour throughout. In some ways she’s speaking on behalf of undecided fans who might not have liked the idea of an older Doctor. The plot attempted very carefully through its actions and dialogue to persuade both Clara and them that Capaldi is everything Matt Smith was and more.

The Eleventh Doctor himself even came back to bring assurance that the new Doctor is still the Doctor and that he himself is giving the thumbs up. By that point everyone, including Clara, is made aware of this story point and the Twelfth Doctor is completely accepted.

I believe ‘Deep Breath’ proved as a success and really brought about the ideas of how the show will run now and of course on what to expect from the brilliant Peter Capaldi. He was bold, fierce and totally unpredictable within the role. It left you totally intrigued with his character and wanting to know how his incarnation would continue to progress.

Step back in time...

COMMENT GUIDELINES

Please be civil and keep article comments relevant and on topic. Flag and report any offensive/trolling behavior, or contact us with details.
Please do not post SPOILERS including anything from leaked episodes! Your account could be banned. For complete details on our comment policy please read.
59 comments
madbuk
madbuk

" ‘Dark’ doesn’t necessarily mean explicit." Thank you David. A lot of people seem to think that dark means gore. It doesn't. It's about the concepts that are touched upon in the episode, not just the death count.



LordRassilon
LordRassilon

'It was as if her dialogue was written for a character that was totally unaware of regeneration but Clara was well acquainted to this procedure by that point.'



I feel this is quite, quite intentional: If you look at the underlying paradox, the events of entering the wound in time at Trenzalore have been erased, by the new regeneration cycle. Thus, Clara had never shattered, but at the same time, she must've done (else, she wouldn't be here, as a companion). While The Doctor may be able to maintain the recollection of those events, I doubt that Clara can do likewise.

That also leave other threads loose, to taunt us.

bringmeknitting
bringmeknitting

Thank you both gentlemen for excellent and thoughtful pieces :)

HunterGraybeal
HunterGraybeal

Over and over again I hear the same comment about Clara; she should be used to regeneration because different versions of her have known all the Doctors. It shouldn't be so surprising or disturbing. Why is this so readily assumed? Yes, she acquainted herself with all the Doctors, so she knows he has had "many faces, many lives." The regenerations themselves, however, are already committed to film and, save Eleven's...she wasn't there. She absolutely has never watched regeneration happen, nor has she experienced the mental & physical aftermath that the Doctor endures until his new physiology catches up to all the knowledge and memory he carries. Likewise the Doctor has never said that he cannot regenerate back into the same appearance (in fact, he did exactly that as Ten), so her question of why he did not or cannot isn't a stupid one. We even heard her beg him not to change just before he whiplashes into Twelve. In addition, the Doctor hasn't regenerated into a noticeably older man since many incarnations ago. (Yes, yes, Colin Baker was older than Peter Davison, but not obviously so.) It is understandably jarring for her that the Doctor didn't regenerate into yet another young looking man, but into as old-looking a man as he's ever started out as. I simply can't understand why Clara's (IMO) very understandable reactions have so many fans frustrated just because she's seen that he has had different incarnations.












09dh01
09dh01

The only criticism I can find with the episode is that Capadi's Doctor didn't appear on-screen nearly enough. Other than that, I think it was perfect; there wasn't too much Strax-slapstick, the Matt Smith cameo didn't feel as random or awkward as I thought it would be, the Missy appearance was genuinely a surprise and hadn't been rumoured beforehand, the Sonic Screwdriver wasn't being used to save the world every few seconds, the clockwork droids were brought back in a tasteful fashion, and Capaldi was far better than I ever imagined (and I really did imagine that he'd be fantastic).

Best series-opener in New Who... Perhaps even the best introduction to a new Doctor since Spearhead from Space (not counting Day of the Doctor).

I cannot wait for Saturday!

TheIdleIdol
TheIdleIdol

I've been saying it for a while now, and I'll say it again: to my mind, Deep Breath is the best series opener/new Doctor debut yet. It doesn't molly coddle you or hold your hand, it doesn't ease you in gently with a fluffy, warm reintroduction - it struts up confidently, slaps you in the face, and tells you to follow. And you do. It combines the better aspects of episodes like The Eleventh Hour or Rose with the frenetic action of our last two series openers, whilst tightly packing oodles of character development (for the Doctor, Clara and the Paternosters), some very unsettling themes and undertones, countless twists and turns, excellent visuals and some terrific dialogue into one tidy, little package. Though complex, the plot wasn't at all contrived, the pacing felt more or less spot on (though we must account for the vastly extended run-time), and Capaldi really stole the show - I feel like we've been watching his incarnation for years already, he absolutely commanded every scene. I can't think of anything that would have markedly improved the episode, and I can't think of anything that significantly detracted from it (other than some poor logic at times, but hey - this is Doctor Who). Even trying to be cynical, as I all too often am, I can't give Deep Breath any less than a commendable 9/10. If the rest of the series (and Capaldi's tenure) lives up to this, then I've already forgotten who the last Doctor was. David Eccleston or something? Don't know, don't care.

Green TARDIS
Green TARDIS

I think you appreciate Deep Breath a little more after a second viewing. I definitely did


NineTenElevenTwelve
NineTenElevenTwelve

I absolutely loved Deep Breath. Does it have its flaws? Sure. But I still found Capaldi to be a very interesting, unpredictable, and intense Doctor; Clara's characterization and development were outstanding (though, granted, some of it was a bit over the top in relation to her response to the Doctor's regeneration); the Paternoster Gang were used incredibly well; the villains were intimidating; Matt Smith's cameo was fitting and touching; and the plot threads set up for Series 8 are interesting. Others may disagree with me and that's fine; but I still found Deep Breath to be a superb episode and a perfect start for the era of the Twelfth Doctor!

Noybusiness
Noybusiness

"But alas Moffat proved that they could easily be incorporated into a second story with ease and better still received further development."

Er, 'alas' is an expression of grief or pity. I'm an editor/proofreader, so this jumped out at me.

AndrewMarsden
AndrewMarsden

I agreed with the point about how The Doctor acquired the tramp's coat - it did seem very ambiguoys as to whether ge did buy it or took it by force. Capaldi was scary in that scene - brilliant stuff!

SirTrey
SirTrey

With regards to Clara's reaction, I somewhat understand her petulance.  It's one thing to be aware of regeneration - she seems to know of her prior selves working with the Doctor after jumping into the timestream and saw all prior incarnations - but entirely another matter to see it in front of you with the Doctor you've been traveling with for quite a while and begun to fancy.  It's one of those things that would still be rather shocking and difficult.

Also, we don't know if she was ever near or with any of the Doctors in the background during their regeneration or shortly afterwards so she may not have been aware of how it occurs or the general confusion the Doctor feels after a regeneration...I'm sure his sudden lack of memory regarding her name and how to fly the TARDIS was rather concerning.   Finally, we're also not sure how much time passed between the end of Time of the Doctor and the beginning of Deep Breath; if it was a very short timeframe, she would've gone in maybe a half hour from thinking the Doctor was going to die permanently to watching her Doctor change to hearing him not remember her and getting swallowed by a dinosaur.  Lots to take in, so I'll excuse a bit of an overreaction at first.  

 Notsosmartguy
Notsosmartguy

The more you think about this episode the more messed up this episode is. Especially the stuff with the Clockwork droids wearing human body parts, another implication of Vastra eating people, and a BALLOON MADE OUT OF HUMAN SKIN. It's so dark it's actually kinda hilarious.

Luna23
Luna23

It is almost invariably true that a review will eventually reveal its bias with a select choice of words.  And this review is no exception.  "The plot attempted very carefully through its actions and dialogue to persuade both Clara and them that Capaldi is everything Matt Smith was and more". Obviously, for this author, Peter Capaldi is "more".  But do not confuse your own bias with the intent of the program, nor what the "audience" thinks of Peter Capaldi. 

Huknar
Huknar

One of my favourite parts of Deep Breath was the music. That beautiful, dramatic slow drum melody as the camera zooms out of the collapsed Doctor, the absolutely mad, nutty, totally fun track when the Doctor wakes up. (Door, boring. Not me!) And the super epic, "The Doctor is In" piece that plays when he grabs Clara's hand and intensifies when the paternoster gang come in. Not to mention Eleven's final goodbye piece which after having no new tracks for Time of the Doctor regeneration, was beautiful to hear. 

I am very excited for series 8's soundtrack, it looks to be the best yet. Question is...which one is the Doctors theme? None? All? I'm betting on the one where he grabs Clara's hand. 

MrRazza, Investigating Missy and Mr Pink
MrRazza, Investigating Missy and Mr Pink

I think I've ranted at length below the line of many articles on what I disliked about the episode. My opinion of the Paternoster Gang remains unchanged - though Strax redeemed himself slightly - and I continue to outright hate the phonecall scene. Both opinions I recognise will always be unpopular, but there we go. I found the first third slow, but also recognise that to some extent it needs to be, as well as the slightly watered-down plot. 

However, I want to be positive today, and as I even acknowledged in my past periods of pontificating, these negatives are dwarfed by the rest of the episode. I feel Clara emerged as a stronger character ultimately, it was nice to see 12 lay into her a little to point out and acknowledge her flaws, and while I still think her reaction was initially good but by the end of the episode laboured (there were quite a few "he's the Doctor if..." moments) simply to allow the phonecall, and... No, positive thoughts MrRazza! The tone was fantastic. Darker without being oppressive and mature without being adult, the "I have bad eyes" scene was brilliant, as was the struggle between 12 and the half faced man. And speaking of 12, Capaldi was a master. From confused and still slightly Smith hung-over at the start to pleasingly erratic (still loving the jabs at Scottish independence via eyebrows and the death of a woman called Margaret Roberts [Roberts being Margaret Thatcher's maiden name]) to outright chilling, captivating throughout and definitely going to be a truly marvelous Doctor. Finally, Deep Breath is remarkable for its striking and potentially iconic scenes. Clara's "Deep Breath" is one of the finest pieces of TV I have seen for a good while, and the half faced man speared on the top of Elizabeth Tower - with the cause of his fall unknown - has rooted itself in my mind.


Overall, Deep Breath most certainly receives (yes, it's the long awaited return of it!) MrRazza's Thumbs Up of Approval. It wasn't flawless, but then few episodes are, and I think a direct comparison to The Eleventh Hour is inappropriate, besides in a usual "comparing two episodes" way. Both have their own intentions and aims, and do them in very different ways. Judge them each on their own merits. However, if we do want to do a direct "comparing two episodes", I have to say I'm voting Deep Breath, and I continue to give it a full and solid 8/10.


TheOncomingHurricane
TheOncomingHurricane

'The dinosaur makes for a gripping opening and a poignant scene posthumously, but it raises too many questions to be taken seriously. How was it pulled forward through time by the TARDIS?' 

It's been established that living beings in contact with the TARDIS get pulled along...although that must have been rough for the dinosaur, she must have wondered why she was being pulled along by the throat at an insane speed XD





Meh Meh Meh Meh Meh
Meh Meh Meh Meh Meh

Great articles.

David, your point about the "corrupted Heaven" was very interesting... What if this "Heaven" (I'm putting it in quotes because I highly doubt it's the Biblical Heaven) is actually a horrible trap disguised by a beautiful garden?

twoheartsonemind
twoheartsonemind

Was anyone else wondering if Missy was indeed talking about the Doctor when she mentioned her "boyfriend"? Being that the Half Faced Man was transported to another place, could there have been someone else along the way that he met who was this "boyfriend"? Just a thought.

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

Two good reviews, though I disagree with you John about Clara. I quote you twice

"Her best friend was gone and will never come back but she doesn’t really give the new Doctor a chance to explain himself, nor express the fact he was still the same man."

"The Twelfth Doctor showcased that he could be a truly alien and dark Doctor. He abandoned poor Clara without any true remorse"

It's precisely this behaviour which explains why Clara is unsettled by the new Doctor, even at the end of the episode. After Clara's ordeal, 11 would have apologised, hugged Clara, kissed her forehead, and made her feel safe. With 12 there were so such reassurances, so it's hardly surprising that she's still unsure about him. 11's call made her realise how much the Doctor as 12 still needed her, which brought out her caring side - she's his carer!

Gustaff
Gustaff

Odd example I know, but childhood friends I run into after not seeing them for like a decade don't react like Clara did when they notice how much I've changed

Reactions I've already gotten:

"Gustaff, you got even TALLER! Are you kidding me? (laughs)"

"Gustaff, when did you become such a gym junkie?"


Reactions I don't get:

"Gustaff, I get that you have no control over your height, but maybe we should just catch up later (never calls back)"

"Gustaff, I liked you better when I was the only one in the group who worked out."


Simple examples I know, but think about it... My present self is radically different than me from 10 years ago. Some of my friendships come from being 12-13 and are still there. In DW, the change is physical with the change in face, but hey, we don't insult people who get work done if you know what I mean...well not to their faces anyway.


I used to be naive and optimistic about everything, now I'm a realist who's careful and aware that the world has dangers. I used to put things off till the last minute, now I plan like crazy for every situation - even those that haven't occurred yet/unlikely to occur. I want to be one step ahead. I sound very different, but most of my friendships are still there. My friends didn't decide they liked me better before. Some are still just as lazy as I was, but we don't care.

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

Quite strange to get a 2nd Opinion article in which both writers liked the episode :-)

Gustaff
Gustaff

Ah! David! You have such a wonderful way with words. it's so nice reading two reviews from two people with radically different styles, both so wonderful. This was a treat to read. From me to both of you: Good Job!


Agree about Clara, not so much on Strax. I like him and I liked the magical water bucket disappearing scene so much!

 Notsosmartguy
Notsosmartguy

Knowing about regeneration and witnessing it are two different things. Clara was emotionally attached to 11 to to point she even was in love with him, I think we can cut her some slack. Besides 12 didn't make it any easier when it looked like he left her. I'd also like to point out that she still has enough faith in the Doctor not to give up information to the half face man.

sontaran17
sontaran17

And on the running time - It may be a tad of an ask, but how brilliant would it be if every opener was feature length from now on! Starts the series off with a substantial bang! 

sontaran17
sontaran17

David - Stunning Half, reflected my views perfectly , John - Again a stunning article and just review, though like with Clint's yesturday I do take issue with your point on Clara's attitude to the regeneration - Prior Knowledge doesn't really ensure she can't be shocked - Its a very confronting turn of events for anyone - Even to an extent the Doctor himself -- Clara is knowledgeable with Regeneration yes, but that doesn't mean that she wouldn't get a shock by watching it happen with a jolt right infront of her eyes - Not to mention her initial hesitance to the New Doctor is (what I thought) not overly due to the fact that he has changed - but the fact that the change has been so drastic - and that he appears older "Where did he get that face? Why's it got lines on it, it's brand new. How can his hair be all grey, he only just got it. "  "You said renewed. He doesn't look renewed, he looks ... older."   -- Its more shock and initial adjustments rather then an apparent lack of knowledge or judgement





bringmeknitting
bringmeknitting

@HunterGraybeal Very well said. I was thinking, when has the Doctor EVER regenerated into a noticeably older person in front of a companion? 

bringmeknitting
bringmeknitting

@Green TARDIS Absolutely. Amazingly I found it a bit so-so on first viewing, but it got way better on second and third goes. 

AndrewMarsden
AndrewMarsden

Where's the edit button gone? My above post has typos - I hate typos! :-)

The 14th Doctor
The 14th Doctor

Not to mention The Doctor himself disguised wearing a human face.

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

@Huknar Some very nice music, but nothing as obviously upfront as "I am the Doctor". After Saturday we may have a better clue!

Whodman6
Whodman6

I thought that is what she meant

Whodman6
Whodman6

But her reaction was over the top, while she had a right to be upset. Her reaction was more of anger, betrayal and confusion, which shouldn't be the case as she knows every doctor and is well aware of regeneration and the concept of a new doctor especially as she had been saving them all her life. I think Moffat must've forgotten about the events of the last 3 episodes.

Gustaff
Gustaff

I will concede that the change happened instantly and wouldve been a bit of shock, but clara seemed to make up her mind from the very start.

LordRassilon
LordRassilon

@bringmeknitting @HunterGraybeal 

Colin Baker->Sylvester McCoy, and Pat Troughton->Jon Pertwee, are two incarnations that regenerated from a (seemingly) younger form.


Jon was admittedly, a face selected by the Celestial Intervention Agency (canon, 'The Deadly Assassin'), however Colin, was another instance of The Doctor regenerating into an outwardly older body. Both were after an intense, physical, and mental crisis; and both flowed out of a more manic, and childish Doctor.


Notably, both Colin, and Sylvester are (were) the 'darkest' of all past incarnations; barring Zagreus, and The Valeyard as true candidates. Both were capable of killing, either outright, or with cunning, and guile.

TheIdleIdol
TheIdleIdol

I don't believe this commenting system has an edit function, sadly. If you do happen to find one, I'd gladly trade all of my worldly possessions for that forbidden knowledge.

EyebrowsAttack
EyebrowsAttack

@King Joffery @ Notsosmartguy the dalek of Jersey 

There was a bit before the restaurant scene back in the Paternoster lair when Jenny was telling the dolled up Victorian Clara to keep out of one of the rooms because Vastra was going to have one of the bad guys they had caught over for dinner but not before interrogating him first and it was going to get messy in that room.  Torture and dinner afterwards to clean up the mess, lizard style.

EyebrowsAttack
EyebrowsAttack

@Whodman6 

God forbid someone has an over the top emotional reaction to things.  That would just be...not British!  All jokes aside, I am amazed by how many people who are nothing like Clara and nowhere near her unusual circumstances are so...ahem...over the top in their insistence on how she SHOULD be reacting.  Is how someone reacts believable to another person to the degree that person thinks they might react in similar circumstances?  That would be narcissism, no?  For me, I certainly would not react how Clara reacted and I am not sure that how she reacted reflects well on her character in some ways - but that is just what makes her character development so interesting.  She is the most interesting and vulnerable and engaging and beautiful and bossy cow control freak I have encountered and I certainly want more!

Planet of the Deaf
Planet of the Deaf

@Whodman6 She's only met 3 Doctors, it was the fragments who met the others, and the Doctors she met were (in Day of the Doctor) nothing like 12 was at the start of the episode.

Maybe she though regenerated Doctors started young then got old? She had no problem with the old version of 11 in Time of the Doctor, as it was still HER Doctor, not some strange and tricky version.

MrRazza, Investigating Missy and Mr Pink
MrRazza, Investigating Missy and Mr Pink

@TheIdleIdol *Descends on TheIdleIdol like a bat in the night*

Actually, if your comments get reported enough that you're put on the pre-moderation list, where a moderator has to check your comment before making it public, you still get the "Edit within 5 minutes" option. The downside is of course there can be a wait for a while sometimes for your comment to appear, and the way to get on the list is unpleasant...

Basically, it's not a solution, but it is a way of getting an edit function. I look forward to receiving your worldly possessions in the post. ;)  


Gustaff
Gustaff

He was sick. Ill. She even admitted it. You remember who much of a pain in the a** when you or one of your family members were sick?

sontaran17
sontaran17

@Gustaff Yes, and also know how well do the people around you react to Sick Pain in the A** Connor